As mayor, Richard J. Daley focused on municipal services and the development of the city center, contributing to the oft-cited image of Chicago as “the city that works.” During his first term, the city added new garbage trucks, sewers, street and alley lighting, downtown parking facilities and more police and fire personnel. Under his watch, the Central District Filtration Plant (1968), the largest in the world, provided fluoridated water to the central and north sides and the South Water Filtration Plant was expanded. In 1975, the Deep Tunnel project (Tunnel and Reservoir Plan) was begun to relieve flooding in the metropolitan area. The city’s first bicycle paths and first city-sponsored neighborhood health clinics were initiated and neighborhood cleanup campaigns were begun.

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Richard J. Daley attending police roll call at city hall, ca.1950s.Copelin Commercial Photographers RJD_04_01_0004_0004_005

Richard J. Daley attending police roll call at city hall, ca.1950s. Copelin Commercial Photographers RJD_04_01_0004_0004_005

Dr. Paul Dudley White and Richard J. Daley (right) riding a tandem bike to help open a bicycle path on Ogden Avenue, 1956. RJD_04_01_0004_0004_013

Dr. Paul Dudley White and Richard J. Daley (right) riding a tandem bike to help open a bicycle path on Ogden Avenue, 1956. RJD_04_01_0004_0004_013

Jack Brickhouse of WGN interviewing Mayor Richard J. Daley about a Cleanup Parade on State Street, April 12, 1958. RJD_04_01_0019_0012_006

Jack Brickhouse of WGN interviewing Mayor Richard J. Daley about a Cleanup Parade on State Street, April 12, 1958. RJD_04_01_0019_0012_006

 11th Ward Cleanup Parade Float, undated. RJD_04_01_0038_0020_006

11th Ward Cleanup Parade Float, undated. RJD_04_01_0038_0020_006