News and Research Funds

Forty years of service and family

On this date in 1936, Richard J. Daley married Eleanor “Sis” Guilfoyle. Later that year, Richard won his first elected position (as a representative in the Illinois General Assembly) and within 20 years, he became mayor of Chicago, serving until his death in 1976.

Over those 40 years, Richard and Eleanor stood by each other.

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley standing in front of their bungalow at 3536 S. Lowe.

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley standing in front of their bungalow at 3536 S. Lowe. RJD_04_01_0029_0011_003

They raised seven children.

The Daley family at Halloween

The Daley family at Halloween, October 30, 1951. RJD_04_01_0003_0008_010

County Clerk ceremony. Richard J. Daley with his wife Eleanor Daley, their seven children, and Daley's father (Michael Daley), 1955.

County Clerk ceremony. Richard J. Daley with his wife Eleanor Daley, their seven children, and Daley’s father (Michael Daley), 1955. RJD_04_01_0008_0002_007

They voted together.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley at their Bridgeport polling place, 1975.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley at their Bridgeport polling place, 1975. RJD_04_01_0035_0007_008

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley in voting booth

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley in voting booth, 1963. RJD_04_01_0022_0008_016

They traveled together.

Daley family arrival at Hilo, Hawaii airport for the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Daley family arrival at Hilo, Hawaii airport for the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Also included are Helene H. Hale, Hawaii County Chairman and Glenn Oda, Pres. of Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce, 1963. RJD_04_01_0048_0009_005

And together they participated in and contributed to Chicago’s cultural and political life.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley standing with members of the Illinois Democratic Women’s Club

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley standing with members of the Illinois Democratic Women’s Club at their luncheon, ca. 1960s. RJD_04_01_0017_0001_013

Eleanor Daley, Richard J. Daley, William Daley, John Daley and others at Mayor Daley's celebration of 14 years in office as mayor, 1969. Photo: Mart Studios. RJD_04_01_0028_0010_001.

Eleanor Daley, Richard J. Daley, William Daley, John Daley and others at Mayor Daley’s celebration of 14 years in office as mayor, 1969. Photo: Mart Studios. RJD_04_01_0028_0010_001.

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with costumed Mrs. O'Leary and cow

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with costumed Mrs. O’Leary and cow, 1976. RJD_04_01_0036_0006_003

For more information, see the online list of interviews from the Richard J. Daley oral history Collection, where you can find accounts from friends, family members, and colleagues of the mayor. See also the finding aid (inventory listing) for the Richard J. Daley Collection at UIC Library. The collection is open to the public. If interested, feel free to Ask a Librarian to set up an appointment.

Featuring: For Chicago Records

UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds a small collection called the For Chicago Records. These materials document what turned out to be Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley’s last reelection campaign in 1975, and they offer a glimpse into the organizing style that proved so successful for the Mayor. Researchers are invited to check out the online finding aid (inventory listing) for the For Chicago Records as well as the list of finding aids for the other archival collections housed at UIC Library.

If you have questions or are interested in making and appointment, feel free to ask a librarian.

Regina Dominican High School student wins Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere History Award

Over the past decade, the University Library has partnered with the Chicago Metro History Fair to cultivate area students’ interest in the subject, teach critical thinking skills and illuminate the present by uncovering the past.

Emily McNaughton accepts the Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere History Award, presented by University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, Mary M. Case.

Emily McNaughton accepts the Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere History Award, presented by University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, Mary M. Case.

Each year, students from the Chicago area visit the Richard J. Daley Library for a “Research Palooza” event, during which they learn to efficiently and thoroughly search for information using the library’s online resources. They also receive valuable individualized coaching from librarians on their projects, including how to incorporate primary resources into their research.

The University Library sponsors one of the awards presented at the annual History Fair ceremony. This year, Emily McNaughton of the Regina Dominican High School earned the Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award (a monetary award of $300) for her project, “Mary Bartelme: The Woman Who Changed the Lives of Young Girls.” She completed her research on the first woman judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County assigned to the Juvenile Court in 1923 using UIC’s Midwest Women’s Historical Collection.

Congratulations to Emily McNaughton and all of the students who participated in this year’s Chicago Metro History Fair!

Thank you!

The Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award is generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Announcing the 2017 University Library Fellows

In May 2017 four Short-Term Travel Fellowships were awarded to individuals studying at universities in the United States, Canada and China. In addition, two University of Illinois at Chicago Graduate Student Fellowships were awarded to UIC scholars.

The Short-Term Fellowship gives individual researchers, teachers and writers of any nationality who live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area the opportunity to travel to UIC to conduct research. The UIC Graduate Student Fellowship is open to students who are enrolled in a graduate degree program in any discipline at UIC.

Congratulations to the 2017 fellows!

UIC Library short term fellowship awardees

Richard D. Benson II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Education Department
Spelman College
City of Wind, City of Fire: Education and Activism in Chicago 1966 – 1975

Maria Daxenbichler, Ph.D. candidate, Department of History
University of Buffalo
Women’s Movements for Reproductive Health in the Early Twentieth Century

Priscilla Roberts, Faculty of Business
City University of Macau
The Chicago Council on Foreign Relations and the Making of U.S. International Policies since 1922

Ian Rocksborough-Smith, Instructor, History
Corpus Christi and St. Marks College at the University of British Columbia
The Ambiguities of Catholic Inter-racialism in 1950s Chicago: Friendship House and the Catholic Interracial Council

UIC Library graduate student fellowship awardees

Meghan Daniel, Ph.D. student, Sociology
Margins to Center:  A Decade of Reproductive Justice Organizing

Marla McMackin, Ph.D. student, History
Migrant Daughters: Hull House and Gendered Social Services in Late Twentieth Century Chicago

Interested in applying?

The application cycle for the 2018 UIC Library Fellowship program begins in November 2017. Further details will be forthcoming on library.uic.edu.

Thank you!

The UIC Graduate Student and Short-Term Travel Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Day of remembrance

Two soldiers with a minister in Vietnam.

Two soldiers with a minister in Vietnam. RJD_04_01_0055_0001_006

Happy 115th Birthday!

Today marks the 115th anniversary of the birth of Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, who was born on May 15, 1902.

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

Revisiting the first inauguration, April 20, 1955

Sixty-two years ago today, Richard J. Daley was inaugurated for the first time as mayor of Chicago.

You can watch portions of Mayor Daley’s first inaugural address:

Video: Excerpt from “1955 Inauguration,” RJD_04_02_0000_0000_213

Fifty years ago today…

On April 4, 1967, Mayor Richard J. Daley won reelection to his fourth consecutive term in office. Daley beat his opponent, Republican John Warner, by a vote of 792,238 to 272,542.

Only two mayors in Chicago history have matched this feat. The first was Carter Henry Harrison, who won reelection to a fourth term in 1885. The second was Daley’s son, Richard M. Daley, who won his fourth term in 1999 and was reelected twice more, in 2003 and 2007.

Richard J. Daley on the telephone while seated at a desk

Richard J. Daley on the telephone while seated at a desk, undated. Photo: Illinois Bell Telephone Company. RJD_04_01_0040_0005_006

Source for facts: “Chicago Mayors, 1837-2007,” Encyclopedia of Chicago, <http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/1443.html>. Accessed March 28, 2017.

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

Richard J. Daley waving at St. Patrick's Day parade.

Richard J. Daley waving at St. Patrick’s Day parade. Photo: László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0004_0011_019

One step closer to the mayoralty

On this date in 1955, Richard J. Daley secured the Democratic nomination to run for mayor of Chicago. He had defeated Martin Kennelly, a Democrat who had been mayor of Chicago since 1947, by more than 100,000 votes. UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds the papers of both Richard J. Daley and Martin Kennelly. See the finding aids (inventory listings) for Kennelly and for Daley, and make an appointment to look at the collections in person in our reading room.

Richard J. Daley speaking on a stage in Bridgeport during his first mayoral campaign, 1955. RJD_04_01_0011_0001_022

Richard J. Daley speaking on a stage in Bridgeport during his first mayoral campaign, 1955. RJD_04_01_0011_0001_022

See also: “Kennelly beaten by 100,064 plurality,” Chicago Tribune, February 23, 1955, p. 1.

Presidents Day, Daley-style

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley maintained a working relationship with each occupant of the White House. As head of one of the United States’ most important cities, he received visits from every president, Democrat or Republican.

Eleanor Daley presents Mamie Eisenhower with a bouquet of flowers at the airport.

Eleanor Daley presents Mamie Eisenhower with a bouquet of flowers at the airport. Also present are Richard J. Daley, Mrs. Stratton, Governor Stratton, President Dwight Eisenhower, and others. RJD_04_01_0045_0009_001

President Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard J. Daley at the airport

President Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard J. Daley at the airport, ca. 1960s. RJD_04_01_0046_0010_015

President Gerald Ford speaks with Richard J. Daley

President Gerald Ford speaks with Richard J. Daley, 1974. RJD_04_01_0053_0002_001

When Daley visited Washington D.C., the president often sought his advice on important matters, especially those that concerned urban affairs.

Richard J. Daley meets with President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Richard J. Daley meets with President Lyndon Baines Johnson, ca. 1963-1969. RJD_04_01_0072_0001_003

Mayor Richard J. Daley was the only Democrat invited to this meeting of Nixon cabinet members at the White House

Mayor Richard J. Daley was the only Democrat invited to this meeting of Nixon cabinet members at the White House, 1969. Photo: Official Photograph White House. RJD_04_01_0052_0007_001

In addition to serving as Chicago’s mayor, Daley chaired the Cook County Democratic Party. This influential post gave Daley a significant say in the operations of the party at the national level. Former and current Democratic presidents maintained friendships with their fellow party member.

Former President Harry Truman shaking hands with Richard J. Daley

Former President Harry Truman shaking hands with Richard J. Daley. Truman inscribed this photo, “A most pleasant meeting with a great mayor.” RJD_04_01_0044_0007_001

President John F. Kennedy and Richard J. Daley walk outside on the street in Chicago

President John F. Kennedy and Richard J. Daley walk outside on the street in Chicago, undated. RJD_04_01_0046_0012_019

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley, Col. Jack Riley, Lady Bird Johnson, and President Lyndon B. Johnson in Chinatown, May 17, 1966. RJD_04_01_0073_0001_009

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley, Col. Jack Riley, Lady Bird Johnson, and President Lyndon B. Johnson in Chinatown, May 17, 1966. RJD_04_01_0073_0001_009

Those Democrats who aspired to be president also visited Daley, seeking his support for their nomination and eager to work with him during the general election.

Richard J. Daley at podium in Sherman House Hotel with Edward Kennedy(left) and Senator George McGovern

Richard J. Daley at podium in Sherman House Hotel with Edward Kennedy (left) and Senator George McGovern (right), ca. 1972. RJD_04_01_0052_0012_005

Jimmy Carter and Richard J. Daley wave to the crowd in a parade car

Jimmy Carter and Richard J. Daley waving to the crowd from an open car at a Carter campaign event, 1976. RJD_04_01_0053_0011_010

UIC classes explore Daley legacy 40 years after death

[originally written by Carlos Sadovi, of the UIC News Center, on January 10, 2017. See the original article, “UIC classes explore Daley legacy 40 years after death.”]

Richard J. Daley standing in front of lakefront skyline, ca. 1972-1976. Photo: László Kondor. RJD_04_01_0041_0003_007

Richard J. Daley standing in front of lakefront skyline, ca. 1972-1976. Photo: László Kondor. RJD_04_01_0041_0003_007

When Richard J. Daley died Dec. 20, 1976, Chicago was not the same city that it was when he became mayor 21 years earlier. By the time he died, the tallest skyscrapers in the world were in Chicago, and the city was a required stopover for politicians seeking to run for national office.

Daley’s legacy of working to build up the city of his birth is chronicled in more than 700 feet of personal papers and artifacts housed in the special collections and university archives of UIC’s Richard J. Daley Library.

A series of courses linked to the collection are being planned, ranging from single-credit courses for Honors College students, who represent a variety of majors, to seminars for alumni and community members beginning this spring.

The first courses offered will focus on Daley’s role in making the city a “global contender,” said David Greenstein, visiting lecturer for Special Collections and University Archives.

“A lot of times, we definitely see him as a really important Chicago figure, and we see him as a national figure who did things like work with presidents. But in many ways the issues he was dealing with in Chicago were global issues,” Greenstein said.

Students will meet at the special collections reading room, where they can pore over thousands of pages of first-hand material that illuminate Daley’s political and private life.

Greenstein’s first class, “City at a Crossroads: Local, National, and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968” is offered this semester. He is developing a broader course on the local and global connections in Chicago that he hopes to teach in the fall.

“It’s going to be a great opportunity for students to learn not only about Chicago and Mayor Daley, but also about working with original documents and other information-literacy skills,” Greenstein said.

Over the years, more than 200 patrons have used the Richard J. Daley Collection for research, from doctoral dissertations to middle- and high-school history projects, said Dan Harper, lecturer and the special collection’s assistant archivist. Among the topics studied have been the late mayor’s dealing with unions and labor issues, housing and race issues.

UIC library officials plan to offer several fellowships to UIC graduate students, as well as to researchers who live more than 100 miles away. The library offers an annual Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award for high school students participating in the Chicago Metro History Fair who best utilize the collection for research.

Among the items included in the collection are correspondence with presidents, including a signed photo of John F. Kennedy with Daley and his family at the White House after Kennedy’s inauguration.

In addition, Daley’s role as a growing force within the Democratic National Committee is detailed through correspondence with the committee.

The collection was given to UIC at the behest of Eleanor “Sis” Daley, his wife of 40 years. She donated the papers to the institution whose creation the mayor considered one of his great achievements, said their son William.

“My dad always said the greatest decision he made in his entire political career was the decision to fight for the University of Illinois having a Chicago campus,” William Daley said.

Featuring: the David Orr Papers

UIC Special Collections and University Archives has just processed a small collection of holdings from a key figure in Chicago and Cook County political history, the David Orr Papers.

Orr was a alderman in the Chicago City Council and since 1991, has served as Clerk of Cook County. After the sudden and unexpected death of Mayor Harold Washington in 1987, Orr served as acting mayor until the City Council named Eugene Sawyer.

The David Orr Papers is a small collection, only 14 folders. But those folders give glimpses of Orr’s long career of public service, especially in the 2010s. Feel free to check out the finding aid (inventory list) for the David Orr Papers and visit UIC Special Collections and University Archives to see the collection for yourself.

Mayor Daley and social services

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley sponsored or facilitated numerous programs designed to make it easier for citizens to access social services.

Richard J. Daley onstage at what is probably a 911 kickoff event.

Richard J. Daley onstage at what is probably a 911 kickoff event. Chicago adopted 911 for all emergency calls in 1976. RJD_04_01_0067_0002_005

Featuring: the Earl Bush Papers

Earl Bush (b. 1915 – d. 2006) served as press secretary for Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley from 1955 to 1973. He briefed the press, provided advice, and wrote speeches for the mayor. UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds approximately 6.5 feet of drafts of speeches, newspaper clippings and other material from Bush’s tenure. Check out the Earl Bush Papers finding aid (inventory list) to see what’s in the collection, and visit us during out opening hours.

A city mourns…and remembers

Official portrait of Mayor Richard J. Daley.

Official portrait of Mayor Richard J. Daley. Photo: László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0002_0010_034

Forty years ago today, on December 20, 1976,  Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley died suddenly. His death marked the end of his 21-year tenure as mayor and of an even longer career in public service that dated back to at least 1930, when he became deputy county treasurer in 1930.

Sign at Soldier Field: "We Join in Mourning Our Great Leader Richard J. Daley. Goodbye, Friend,"

Sign at Soldier Field: “We Join in Mourning Our Great Leader Richard J. Daley. Goodbye, Friend,” January 1977. RJD_04_01_0037_0009_004

His passing elicited an outpouring of grief from thousands of Chicagoans and others who braved subfreezing weather to pay their respects.

Chicagoans pay their respects to Mayor Richard J. Daley. MSLASZ13_0003_0005_002

Chicagoans pay their respects to Mayor Richard J. Daley. MSLASZ13_0003_0005_002

The city council memorialized the mayor with a unanimous resolution, commending, among other things, Daley’s “enthusiasm for life and his ability to meet any challenge.”

City Council resolution in recognition of Mayor Richard J. Daley's passing, page 1. RJD_03_01_0006_0004_005a

City Council resolution in recognition of Mayor Richard J. Daley’s passing, page 1. RJD_03_01_0006_0004_005a

City Council resolution in recognition of Mayor Richard J. Daley's passing, page 2. RJD_03_01_0006_0004_005b

City Council resolution in recognition of Mayor Richard J. Daley’s passing, page 2. RJD_03_01_0006_0004_005b

Numerous dignitaries attended the mayor’s funeral, including Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. Presdient-elect Jimmy Carter wrote that he was “proud to have known” the mayor.

President-elect Jimmy Carter expresses his condolences on the death of Mayor Richard J. Daley. RJD_01_02_0001_0003_003

President-elect Jimmy Carter expresses his condolences on the death of Mayor Richard J. Daley. RJD_01_02_0001_0003_003

Former President Richard Nixon wrote the Daley family, remembering that the mayor had “always put patriotism above partisanship.”

Former President Richard M. Nixon expresses his condolences on the death of Mayor Richard J. Daley. RJD_01_02_0003_0007_008

Former President Richard M. Nixon expresses his condolences on the death of Mayor Richard J. Daley. RJD_01_02_0003_0007_008

Those who knew, worked with, and admired Daley proceeded to commemorate his long years of public service to Chicago and to Illinois. The Chicago Bar Association held one of the first of these commemorative events. Judge Abraham Lincoln Marovitz, a close friend who had sworn in the mayor for each of the latter’s six inaugurations, said

Richard Daley was the consummate public servant. He was a lawyer and he never forgot it. He had but one client, the City of Chicago….And the only fee ever sought, was the appreciation of his constituents, and the knowledge, that his efforts were instrumental in making Chicago a better place in which to live.

Abraham Lincoln Marovitz, remarks at commemorative luncheon tribute, January 25, 1977, SIIIss1B7-3, Richard J. Daley Collection

Commemorative luncheon tribute to the Honorable Richard J. Daley, hosted by the Chicago Bar Association. RJD_03_01_0006_0004_004

Commemorative luncheon tribute to the Honorable Richard J. Daley, hosted by the Chicago Bar Association. RJD_03_01_0006_0004_004

Other commemorations followed…

The Richard J. Daley Bicentennial Plaza:

Opening of the Richard J. Daley Bicentennial Plaza, 1978. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_006

Opening of the Richard J. Daley Bicentennial Plaza, 1978. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_006

Springfield, Illinois:

Invitation to the unveiling of a statue to commemorate Mayor Richard J. Daley, 1981. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_003

Invitation to the unveiling of a statue to commemorate Mayor Richard J. Daley, 1981. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_003

A community college:

Program for dedication of the Richard J. Daley Community College, 1982. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_011

Program for dedication of the Richard J. Daley Community College, 1982. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_011

A public library branch:

Dedication of the Richard J. Daley branch of the Chicago Public Library in Bridgeport, 1989. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_005

Dedication of the Richard J. Daley branch of the Chicago Public Library in Bridgeport, 1989. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_005

Mayor Daley’s alma mater:

Advertisement for statue dedication for Mayor Richard J. Daley at his old high school, De La Salle Institute. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_002

Advertisement for statue dedication for Mayor Richard J. Daley at his old high school, De La Salle Institute. RJD_03_01_0007_0009_002

In 2002, on the motion of Aldermen Ed Burke and Burton Natarus, the Chicago City Council celebrated Richard J. Daley’s 100th birthday, noting his “remarkable legacy” and proclaiming “May 1st, 2002, Mayor Richard J. Daley Day.”

City Council resolution honoring the 100th birthday of late Mayor Richard J. Daley, page 1, 2002. RJD_03_01_0007_0011_001a

City Council resolution honoring the 100th birthday of late Mayor Richard J. Daley, page 1, 2002. RJD_03_01_0007_0011_001a

City Council resolution honoring the 100th birthday of late Mayor Richard J. Daley, page 2, 2002. RJD_03_01_0007_0011_001b

City Council resolution honoring the 100th birthday of late Mayor Richard J. Daley, page 2, 2002. RJD_03_01_0007_0011_001b

Research fellowships for scholars who wish to visit UIC Special Collections and University Archives!

University of Illinois at Chicago Library Special Collections Short-Term Fellowships (2017)

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library is now offering Short-Term Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives.

Special Collections at the Richard J. Daley Library houses manuscripts, rare books, photographs, and artifacts on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents the city’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. Premier collections include the papers of Richard J. Daley, the Chicago Urban League, the Century of Progress, exemplars of 21st century design, the Chicago settlement house movement, and the Chicago Board of Trade. Special Collections also holds the Sierra Leone collection, 1792-1825. More information is available at library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to individual researchers, teachers, and writers of any nationality, in any academic discipline. Preference is given to applicants who plan to use UIC political manuscript collections. Applicants must live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area and more than 100 miles from the UIC campus. Past UIC Special Collections fellows are not eligible.

AWARD: $3,000 – $6,000. Stipends will be $3,000 per month for a maximum of two months, June 2017 – April 2018. The stipend will be paid in two installments – one before travel and one after the Fellow submits the midterm report. Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE: January 15, 2017

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report. At the discretion of UIC, the final report may be a presentation during the fellowship period.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter that includes a title and description of your research project and preferred dates of the Fellowship, June 2017 – April 2018.
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words): Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use in the UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.
  3. Proposed outcome of research, such as a paper, chapter, course, etc. (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project.
  4. Budget – list planned expenditures including transportation, housing, and meals.
  5. Curriculum vitae.
  6. Letter of recommendation evaluating your proposed project. (The letter may be sent separately, but in your application please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person who will be writing the recommendation.)

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources

The University of Illinois at Chicago

uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

Incomplete applications will not be processed. Applications will be reviewed by an interdisciplinary committee and selections will be announced in early May.

For questions regarding the fellowship, contact Sonia Yaco, head of UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives syaco@uic.edu.

Research fellowships for UIC graduate students!

University of Illinois at Chicago Library

Special Collections Graduate Student Fellowships (2017)

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library is now offering Graduate Student Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives.

Special Collections at the Richard J. Daley Library houses manuscripts, rare books, photographs, and artifacts on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents the city’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. Premier collections include the papers of Richard J. Daley, the Chicago Urban League, the Century of Progress, exemplars of 21st century design, the Chicago settlement house movement, and the Chicago Board of Trade. Special Collections also holds the Sierra Leone collection, 1792-1825. More information is available at library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to graduate students enrolled in graduate degree programs at UIC. All academic disciplines are eligible. Preference is given to applicants who plan to use UIC political manuscript collections. Past UIC Special Collections fellows are not eligible.

AWARD: $2,000 per semester for one semester, summer 2017, fall 2017, or spring 2018. The Fellowship does not include a tuition waiver. The stipend will be paid in two installments – one before the semester and one after the Fellow submits the midterm report. Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE: January 15, 2017

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report. At the discretion of UIC, the final report may be a presentation.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter that includes a title and description of your research project and preferred semester of the fellowship, summer 2017, fall 2017, or spring 2018.
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words): Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use in the UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.
  3. Proposed outcome of research such as a paper, thesis, etc. (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project.
  4. Curriculum vitae.
  5. Letter of recommendation from your advisor evaluating your proposed project. . (The letter may be sent separately, but in your application please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person who will be writing the recommendation.)

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources

The University of Illinois at Chicago

uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

Incomplete applications will not be processed. Applications will be reviewed by an interdisciplinary committee and selections will be announced in early May 2017.

For questions regarding the fellowship, contact Sonia Yaco, head of UIC Special Collections and University Archives syaco@uic.edu.

An enduring friendship

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley maintained a close relationship with President Lyndon Baines Johnson, who served from 1963 to 1969. The president often sought the mayor’s advice on urban policy and for recommendations on whom to appoint for important federal offices.

President Lyndon B. Johnson wearing checked shirt and cowboy hat, inscription reads, "To Sis and Dick Daley, Devoted friends and two of the most noble public servants that I have known, with affection and respect, Lyndon B. Johnson," 1972.

President Lyndon B. Johnson wearing checked shirt and cowboy hat, inscription reads, “To Sis and Dick Daley, Devoted friends and two of the most noble public servants that I have known, with affection and respect, Lyndon B. Johnson,” 1972. RJD_04_01_0052_0022_014

Featuring: the Barratt O’Hara Papers

The Special Collections and University Archives department at the UIC Library holds the records of Barratt O’Hara. A Democrat, O’Hara served as Illinois’s Lieutenant Governor from 1913 to 1917, and he served in the United States House of Representatives from 1948 to 1968, representing the state’s second congressional district. His papers pertain mostly to his career in the House. Consult the Barratt O’Hara finding aid (or file listing) to see what is in the collection.

You can also find references to O’Hara in the Richard J. Daley Collection. One of them, reproduced below, is a letter from officials of Chicago’s Hotel-Motel Service Workers, Drug Store, Sports Events & Industrial Catering Employees Union, Local 593, AFL-CIO. James Blakely (the union’s secretary-treasurer)  and Theodore C. Lundahl (the union’s president) urge their local’s members to vote for O’Hara in the Democratic primary in 1966, citing his “unique record of public service.”

James Blakely and Theodore C. Lundahl of the Hotel-Motel Service Workers, Drug Store, Sports Events & Industrial Catering Union endorse the reelection of Congressman Barratt O'Hara, June 7, 1966. RJD_04_01_0012_0006_008

James Blakely and Thodore C. Lundahl to “Dear Member,” June 7, 1966. RJD_04_01_0012_0006_008

Researchers interested in seeing the O’Hara papers, the Richard J. Daley collection, or any of our other holdings (see our list of archival finding aids) should feel free to visit Special Collections and University Archives. If you have further questions or wish to make an appointment, please Ask a Librarian for assistance or call us at 312-996-2742.

Happy election day!

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley in voting booth

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley in voting booth, 1963. RJD_04_01_0022_0008_016

That toddlin’ town

Frank Sinatra was one of the many entertainers who often visited Chicago and corresponded with Mayor Richard J. Daley.

Singer Frank Sinatra tells Mayor Daley that Chicago is "my kind of town,"

Singer Frank Sinatra tells Mayor Daley that Chicago is “my kind of town,” 1975. RJD_01_02_0001_0004_010

The hard work of governance….the case of museums

This image is from the first page of a Chicago Park District report on administering the capital improvements program. The district, under the direction of people appointed by Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, helped six of the city’s major museums to invest in improvements, offering to match funds. Reports like this, which Daley likely reviewed on a regular basis, represent the hard work of local government as it worked to provide cultural amenities to citizens and visitors to the City.

First page of a report on administering Chicago-area museums' capital improvements program, 1971. RJD_01_01_0095_0004_001

First page of a report on administering Chicago-area museums’ capital improvements program, 1971. RJD_01_01_0095_0004_001

The full report–as well of thousands of historical documents that provide the “nuts and bolts” of city management, can be accessed at Special Collections and University Archives Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago Library. See the archival finding aid (inventory listing) for the Richard J. Daley Collection. For more information, Ask a Librarian.

Richard J. Daley in the Oval Office

After John F. Kennedy was sworn in, one of his first actions as president was to invite his friend, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, and Daley’s family for a visit.

William Daley, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, President John F. Kennedy, Eleanor Daley, Patricia Daley, John Daley, Mary Carol Daley, Eleanor R. Daley, and Michael Daley in the White House, 1961.

William Daley, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, President John F. Kennedy, Eleanor Daley, Patricia Daley, John Daley, Mary Carol Daley, Eleanor R. Daley, and Michael Daley in the White House, 1961. RJD_04_01_0047_0016_004

Daley’s eldest son, Richard M. Daley, who later also served as Chicago’s mayor (1989-2011) could not attend. He had to stay at college to take a biology exam. His father had told him “You have an exam and that’s your responsibility.” Richard M. reflects further:

He always thought education should be the highest priority. Nothing else should be more important. In government, it was always education….If you solved the education crisis, you solved all of the social ills.

This excerpt comes from Richard M. Daley’s oral history interview (PDF) for this online exhibit.

The Richard L. Curry Papers

UIC Library holds a small collection donated by the late Richard L. Curry (b. 1929 – d. 2015), who worked in the office of Chicago’s corporation counsel from 1956 to 1974 and who was elected in 1974 to the position of Cook County Circuit Court Judge.

These papers contain materials that Curry collected about Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley. They consist of some of Daley’s work schedules, budget messages, campaign pamphlets, speech transcripts, and newspaper clippings about the mayor. This collection is open to the general public at the Special Collections and University Archives reading room in the Richard J. Daley Library. See the Richard L. Curry finding aid (inventory list).

Curry contributed to UIC Library’s Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit, writing a letter in which he reflected on the Daley’s leadership style and his legacy for the city. Read the letter in full (PDF).

Responding to constituents

Chicagoans often informed Mayor Richard J. Daley of needs in their neighborhoods. Sometimes they wrote him, and sometimes they met with him directly. This letter from 1967 represents Daley following up on what he had learned from one of those meetings.

Mayor Richard J. Daley to William L McFetridge of the Chicago Park District, 1967. RJD_01_01_0058_0004_020

Mayor Richard J. Daley to William L McFetridge of the Chicago Park District, 1967. RJD_01_01_0058_0004_020

 

49 years for a Chicago landmark

Visitors to Chicago’s Daley Plaza in the Loop will find one of the city’s iconic pieces of public art in the city, a large untitled sculpture by famed artist Pablo Picasso.

Scene from the dedication of the Picasso sculpture

Scene from the dedication of the Picasso sculpture, August 1967. RJD_04_01_0026_0007_006

Ever since Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley unveiled this sculpture, it has elicited not a little confusion about what it was meant to represent. Listen to the mayor’s comments at the unveiling:

Video: Excerpt from “Richard J. Daley: The Trees He Planted,” written and produced by Joe Howard, Executive Producer Ed Planer. RJD_04_02_0000_0000_016

Convention time!

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley regularly attended and served as an Illinois delegate at the quadrennial Democratic National Conventions, where he often played a key role in deciding whom the Democratic Party nominated for the presidency.

Certification of Richard J. Daley as an elected delegate to the Democratic National Convention, 1972. RJD_02_02_0013_0003_006

Certification of Richard J. Daley as an elected delegate to the Democratic National Convention, 1972. RJD_02_02_0013_0003_006

On this date: honoring a labor leader and a public servant

William D. McFetridge was a union leader and later, president of the Chicago Parks District. The union he represented was the Building Service Employees International Union, of which he became president in 1940. He later served as a vice president for the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO).

Richard J. Daley unveiling McFetridge Dr. sign

Richard J. Daley unveiling McFetridge Dr. sign surrounded by watching crowd, July 14, 1970. McFetridge drive was a causeway into Chicago’s “Museum Campus” where the Shedd Aquarium, Field Museum, and Adler Planetarium are located. RJD_04_01_0032_0009_005

McFetridge supported building construction in Chicago. Of the Marina City residential towers near Chicago’s loop, he welcomed employment opportunities for those he represented, saying, “our jobs are at stake” (New York Times, March 17, 1969).

McFetridge also served the Chicago Park District. He joined the district’s board in 1944 and became the board’s president in 1967. When McFetridge died in 1969, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley stated that his passing “was a great loss to the people of Chicago and a deep personal loss to me. He served with distinction and provided active leadership” (Chicago Tribune, March 18, 1969).

Spring cleaning and Democratic service

One reason the Democratic Party retained Chicagoans’ support was its role in providing neighborhood services. This letter to Mayor Richard J. Daley highlights the party’s use of volunteers to clean the 11th ward, home of mayor’s Bridgeport neighborhood.

Daley served as committeeman (local Democratic Party leader) for the 11th ward (1947-1976) in addition to being mayor of Chicago and chair of the Cook County Democratic Party.

This letter is also addressed to Michael A. Bilandic, who represented the ward in the city council (1969-1976) and succeeded Daley as mayor (1976-1979).

Letter to Mayor Daley about the 11th Ward Spring Cleanup Program

Letter to Mayor Daley about the 11th Ward Spring Cleanup Program, 1971. RJD_01_01_0102_0005_023

The road to Chicago

Monday, May 29, 2016 marks the birthday of Bob Hope. Hope was a vaudeville-style entertainer who performed live, did television shows and starred in movies. On numerous occasions he teamed up with his friend, Bing Crosby, in a series of popular, comedic films in which the hapless pair traveled to exotic locations and got into unlikely adventures.

Beginning with World War II (1939-1945), Hope dedicated much of his professional career to entertaining U.S. troops, particularly those stationed abroad in wartime. Working with the United Service Organizations (USO), an organization dedicated to serving soldiers, he continued these performances through the 1990s.

In honor of Hope’s talents and contributions, Mayor Richard J. Daley proclaimed October 29, 1976–the twenty-seventh anniversary of the actor’s first appearance on television–as “Bob Hope Day” in Chicago.

Bob Hope and Richard J. Daley,

Bob Hope and Richard J. Daley, undated. RJD_04_01_0052_0011_002

Congratulations! Second annual Leadership in the Public Sphere award!

On May 15, 2016, the Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award, sponsored by University Library, was presented to Alex Azar, Else Erling, Bailey Garb, Allie Kreitman, and Hope Thomas as part of the Chicago History Fair. The students from the University of Chicago Lab School created a documentary, “Made for Children Everywhere: the Founding of Chicago’s Juvenile Justice System.” With a final score of 97, this project elicited the following comment from one of the judges:

I have judged History Fair projects for many years now, and rarely have I seen one as intelligent, well-researched, and powerfully argued as this one. The documentary starts with a very lurid exploration of the political world of Hull House women and moves extremely effectively into a wonderful depiction of the creation of Chicago’s juvenile court system. The thesis is significant and carries very well through this well-crafted documentary. Bravo!

According to Carol J. Callahan, Chicago Metro History Fair, “The best news is that this project was chosen to progress to the National History Day competition in Washington, D.C.! Alex, Else, Bailey, Allie and Hope will be joining 60 other competitors from Chicago History Fair in D.C. June 14-19, 2016.”

This award goes to a student or students who best who best use resources at Special Collections and University Archives at UIC, as determined by History Fair judges. Longtime readers of this blog may recall that the first Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award was granted a year ago.

Please join University Library in congratulating the winners and wishing them luck at the national competition in D.C.

Mayor Richard J. Daley and our 33rd president

Today, May 8, marks the birthday of Harry Truman (b. 1884 – d. 1972), the thirty-third president of the United States. Truman served as vice president to Franklin Delano Roosevelt for only a few weeks when Roosevelt passed away unexpectedly.

Upon becoming president, Truman faced numerous challenges. He prosecuted the end of World War II and shepherded the United States during the difficult years that immediately followed the war. Under his watch, the United States continued its engagement with international affairs, subsidizing western European economic recovery under the “Marshall Plan” and leading United Nations forces during the Korean War (1950 – 1953). Domestically, he oversaw the U.S.’s conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy and took steps to advance the cause of civil rights, such as creating a presidential committee to study the issue and ordering the desegregation of the armed forces.

Former President Harry Truman shaking hands with Richard J. Daley

Former President Harry Truman shaking hands with Richard J. Daley. Truman inscribed this photo, “A most pleasant meeting with a great mayor.” RJD_04_01_0044_0007_001

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley met frequently with the former president.

Former President Harry S. Truman, John H. Sengstacke of the Chicago Defender, and Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley in an open car during the Bud Billiken Parade,

Former President Harry S. Truman, John H. Sengstacke of the Chicago Defender, and Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley riding in an open car during the Bud Billiken Parade, 1956. RJD_04_01_0044_0007_003

Truman had a reputation for a feisty personality. Kay Quinlan, personal secretary for Mayor Daley, recalls that one Saturday morning, Truman showed up.

And he came in by himself. And he was staying over at the Sherman, I guess. Vince Leddy was the policeman’s name at the desk, and he came back and he said to me, “You won’t believe who’s here.” And I said, “Who?” He said, “Truman.” I said, “Well, bring him in.” Vince Leddy was sitting at the desk reading something, and Truman came in, had a cane, hit him on the head and said, “Young man, is your mayor in?” So of course the mayor was. “Bring him in, you know, right away.”

Kay Quinlan, Richard J. Daley’s Personal Secretary, interview excerpt, August 7, 2014

A Chicago landmark

In 1973, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley commemorated the construction of what was then the tallest building in the world, the Sears Tower, now known as Willis Tower.

Richard J. Daley speech in front of the Sears Tower

Richard J. Daley giving a speech at an outdoor podium in front of the Sears Tower (now known as the Willis Tower), ca. 1970s. RJD_04_01_0029_0008_010

As this medallion below indicates, the skyscraper has 110 floor and reaches more than 1,400 feet.

Medallion--Sears Tower, 1973 [back]. RJD_06_01_0041_0008_001b

Medallion–Sears Tower, 1973 [back]. RJD_06_01_0041_0008_001b


The medallion and the above photograph are only two of the hundreds of artifacts and thousands photographs to be found in the Richard J. Daley Collection.The collection is open to the public in the reading room at the Special Collections and University Archives in the Richard J. Daley Library at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Please ask a librarian for more information about seeing the collection.

Medallion--Sears Tower, 1973 [front]. RJD_06_01_0041_0008_001a

Medallion–Sears Tower, 1973 [front]. RJD_06_01_0041_0008_001a

Richard J. Daley’s first mayoral victory

Today, April 5, 2016, marks the 61st anniversary of Richard J. Daley’s election as mayor for the first time in 1955.

Richard Daley accepts a neighbor's congratulations after the 1955 election

Richard J. Daley accepts a neighbor’s congratulations the day after the 1955 mayor election, 1955. RJD_04_01_0012_0002_001

The László Kondor Photograph Collection and oral history interview

László Kondor served as Mayor Richard J. Daley’s official photographer from 1972 to 1976.

Richard J. Daley, photographer László Kondor (on left), and others during a Fishing Derby,

Richard J. Daley, photographer László Kondor (on left), and others during a Fishing Derby, ca. 1970s. MSLASZ13_0003_0010_001

In 2013, Kondor donated about 600 photographs, 600 slides, and 3,000 negatives from those years to the University Library. A sample of the images has already been digitized. You can see them here at the Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit.

Official portrait of Mayor Richard J. Daley.

Official portrait of Mayor Richard J. Daley. Photo: László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0002_0010_034

The other photographs are available in the Special Collections and University Archives reading room at the Richard J. Daley Library in Chicago. You can read the  online archival finding aid (inventory listing) for the László Kondor Photograph Collection and Ask a Librarian to make an appointment to see them in person.

Also in 2013, Kondor generously gave his time to do an oral history interview. He discussed his career in photography, his experiences growing up in Hungary and leaving in the wake of the 1956 uprising and what it was like working with Mayor Daley. Read a transcript of Kondor’s interview [PDF]. Audio excerpts from that interview are found in the online exhibit as well.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Richard J. Daley leading a Saint Patrick's Day parade with a shillelagh

Richard J. Daley carrying a shillelagh and leading a Saint Patrick’s Day parade. Father Byrnes and Admiral Galloway are walking beside him. RJD_04_01_0064_0001_009

At the polls

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley at their Bridgeport polling place, 1975.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley at their Bridgeport polling place, 1975. RJD_04_01_0035_0007_008

University of Illinois at Chicago Short-term Travel Fellowships (Summer 2016) for external researchers – DEADLINE EXTENDED

University of Illinois at Chicago Short-term Travel Fellowships (Summer 2016) for external researchers – DEADLINE EXTENDED

The University Library at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) is now offering Short-term Travel Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives at the Richard J. Daley Library and the Library of the Health Sciences.

Special Collections at the Daley Library houses collections of rare books, manuscripts, photographs, and artifacts with a focus on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The strengths of the manuscript collection include the history of the Hull-House settlement; A Century of Progress World’s Fair; Chicago design history; Midwest women’s history; and the history of African Americans in Chicago. Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents Chicago’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. The University Archives at both locations is the depository for historical records of UIC and contains selected papers of prominent faculty, staff, students, and alumni.

For more information:

FIELD OF STUDY: All academic disciplines are eligible.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to individual researchers, teachers, and writers of any nationality to do research in Special Collections and University Archives. Preference given to those applicants who might make best use of UIC political manuscript collections. Applicants must live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area and more than 100 miles from the UIC campus.

AWARD: $3,000 – $6,000. Stipends will be $3,000 per month for a maximum of two months between June 1 and August 31, 2016. The stipend will be paid in two installments – one before travel and one after the fellow submits the midterm report. Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE: April 1, 2016 

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter describing your research topic and preferred dates of the fellowship (during June and August 2016)
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words):  Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use at UIC
  3. Proposed outcome of research (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project
  4. Budget – list planned expenditures including transportation, housing, meals.
  5. Curriculum vitae
  6. Letter of recommendation evaluating your proposed project. (The letter may be sent separately, but please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person writing the recommendation.)

 

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources

The University of Illinois at Chicago

uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

 

Incomplete applications will not be processed. Applications will be reviewed by an interdisciplinary committee and will be announced in May.

 

For questions regarding the fellowship, contact Sonia Yaco, head of UIC Special Collections and University Archives syaco@uic.edu.

UIC’s political collections

Richard J. Daley speaking before the Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry

Richard J. Daley speaking before the Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry, ca. 1959. Photo: Pics Photographers. RJD_04_01_0013_0003_020.

UIC Special Collections and University Archives has more than 50 manuscript collections that pertain to Chicago’s political history, for which the Richard J. Daley Collection forms the cornerstone. Some of these collections deal with the years Richard J. Daley was mayor of Chicago while some deal with later or earlier years.

Check out our list of archival finding aids to see what we have or Ask a Librarian to set up an appointment.

Mayor Richard J. Daley’s personal library available at Special Collections and University Archives

The Richard J. Daley Collection at the University of Illinois at Chicago houses about 700 linear feet of material. Part of that collection is the Mayor’s personal library.

You can find a list of the books in his library in the archival finding aid for Series III, subseries 2 of the collection.

Oral History transcript and cassette. 20150330_113035

Oral History transcript and cassette. 20150330_113035

This library offers a unique insight into the ideas that may have influenced Mayor Daley as he managed the second largest city in the United States.

Because the books from the Mayor’s library are part of a rare collection, they cannot be checked out. But you may read them in the Special Collections and University Archives reading room in the Richard J. Daley Library.

Jimmy Durante visits Chicago!

The singer and comedian Jimmy Durante once entertained the Mayor Richard J. Daley and his wife, Eleanor “Sis” Daley. Here’s a letter expressing his gratefulness for their friendship.

Jimmy Durante thanks Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley for their friendship

Jimmy Durante thanks Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley for their friendship, 1976. RJD_01_02_0001_0004_008

Honoring a colleague: Adlai E. Stevenson II

This past week saw the birthday of Adlai E. Stevenson II (1900-1965), a political colleague of Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley. Stevenson hailed from from a distinguished family (his grandfather had been Vice President of the United States), served as Illinois Governor from 1949 to 1953, received the Democratic Party’s nomination for president in 1952 and 1956, and served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson from 1961 to 1965.

Governor Adlai Stevenson's cabinet-Richard Daley was director of revenue

Governor Adlai Stevenson II and his cabinet. Richard J. Daley, Director of Revenue, is seated on far right. RJD_04_01_0044_0001_001

Daley served as Illinois’s Director of Revenue under Governor Stevenson, and the two forged a friendship marked by mutual admiration and respect.

Richard J. Daley shaking hands with Adlai Stevenson II. Joseph Gill, Jacob Arvey, and Chicago Mayor Martin Kennelly are looking on,

Richard J. Daley about two months after he was elected chairman of the Cook County Democratic Party. He is shaking hands with Adlai Stevenson II. Joseph Gill, Jacob Arvey, and Chicago Mayor Martin Kennelly are looking on, September 1953. RJD_04_01_0045_0001_002

In 1955, Stevenson endorsed Daley in the latter’s first campaign to be Mayor of Chicago. For an excerpt of television ads from that campaign, see the following video. (Stevenson’s television endorsement can be seen at the 5 minute, 50 second mark.)

Video: 1955 Democratic Party Campaign Ads for Television. RJD_04_02_0000_0000_201

Daley won the election. Here is Stevenson looking on as Judge Abraham Lincoln Marovitz swears the new mayor in.

Judge Abraham Lincoln Marovitz swears Richard J. Daley in as mayor for the first time

Judge Abraham Lincoln Marovitz swears Richard J. Daley in as mayor for the first time, April 20, 1955. Adlai Stevenson, Martin Kennelly, and others observe. Photo: Photo Ideas. RJD_04_01_0013_0001_029

Stevenson’s son, Adlai E. Stevenson III, was also a close associate of Daley, serving as a state legislator, state treasurer and from 1970 to 1981, representing Illinois in the United States Senate. Stevenson III contributed to the Richard J. Daley Oral History Collection, offering an interview in which he reflects on his father’s and his own relationship with the mayor. Read a transcript of his interview [PDF document] and transcripts of interviews conducted with the other contributors to the project.

Paying for it all

This pamphlet urgies voters to pass a bond issue, undated. RJD_05_00_0001_0006_003A

This pamphlet urgies voters to pass a bond issue, undated. RJD_05_00_0001_0006_003A

As part of his efforts to improve services to Chicago, Mayor Richard J. Daley advocated for several bond issues in order to pay for such services. For more on Daley’s efforts to budget city services, see the Budget, Banking, and Business section of the Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit.

Pamphlet urging voters to pass a bond issue

Pamphlet urging voters to pass a bond issue. RJD_05_00_0001_0006_003

A man from Bridgeport, a mayor for the city

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley enjoyed political support from much of the city, and most notably from Bridgeport, where he was born and resided all his life. This image comes from his first campaign for mayor.

Richard J. Daley speaking on a stage in Bridgeport during his first mayoral campaign, 1955. RJD_04_01_0011_0001_022

Richard J. Daley speaking on a stage in Bridgeport during his first mayoral campaign, 1955. RJD_04_01_0011_0001_022

From a union family

Mayor Richard J. Daley hailed from a family that valued unions. His father, Michael Daley, was a 50-year member of the Sheet Metal Workers Union. Below is an image of Michael’s union card and a ledger of his dues paid. See this image and other images from the Richard J. Daley Collection at the Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit.

Richard J. Daley's father, Michael Daley, was a 50-year member of the Sheet Metal Workers Union. The Mayor cultivated strong ties with that union and with other unions. RJD_ 03_01_0003_0001_001 and RJD_03_0003_0001_002

Richard J. Daley’s father, Michael Daley, was a 50-year member of the Sheet Metal Workers Union. The Mayor cultivated strong ties with that union and with other unions. RJD_ 03_01_0003_0001_001 and RJD_03_0003_0001_002

Andrew Young on Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1966 visit to Chicago

Andrew Young worked with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). He later served as a Congressperson, as United States Ambassador to the United Nations under President Jimmy Carter, and as mayor of the Atlanta, Georgia.

Young accompanied King on the SCLC’s campaign in 1966 to address housing problems in Chicago. In this clip, Young relates an anecdote about Mayor Richard J. Daley’s efforts to accommodate King.

Video: Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta, interview excerpt, October 16, 2014

This clip and other clips and excerpts from oral history interviews about the interactions between Mayor Daley and Martin Luther King Jr. can be found in the Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit and in the Richard J. Daley Oral History Collection.

Job announcement [updated: note new due date]

Visiting Lecturer, Curriculum Development

The University of Illinois at Chicago

Richard J. Daley Library

Special Collections and University Archives Department

 

The University Library is now accepting applications for the position of Visiting Lecturer, Curriculum Development. The Visiting Lecturer will use the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives to develop course proposals and detailed syllabi for Honors Seminars and other courses. Special Collections at the Daley Library houses collections of rare books, manuscripts, photographs, and artifacts with particular strength in the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents Chicago’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. The University Archives at both locations is the depository for historical records of the University of Illinois at Chicago and contains selected papers of prominent faculty, staff, students, and alumni. More information is available at: http://library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

 

Responsibilities: The Visiting Lecturer will develop course proposals and detailed syllabi for Honors Seminars and other courses utilizing the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives. Job duties may include teaching one or more of the courses.

Honors seminars are elective, one-credit hour courses open to all Honors College students. Information about course proposals: http://uic.edu/honors/fellows/seminarproposal.shtml

 

Minimum qualifications:

  • PHD, completed or near completion, in library and information studies, history, education, public administration, political science, or related fields.
  • experience in developing course proposals
  • knowledge of Chicago political history
  • ability to work independently and communicate effectively with faculty.

 

Contract Term: One-year appointment, with the possibility of renewal for a second year.

 

Salary:

Salary is dependent upon qualifications and experience. Benefits for a twelve month appointment include 24 days of vacation, 12 annual sick leave with additional disability benefits, 11 paid holidays; paid medical insurance (contribution based on annual salary, coverage for dependents may be purchased); two dental plans available; life insurance paid for by the State; participation in one of the retirement options of the State Universities Retirement System compulsory; no Social Security coverage but Medicare payment required.

For fullest consideration, apply by January 31, 2016 with cover letter, supporting resume and name, and contact information of three references to uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com.

 

Library Human Resources

University of Illinois at Chicago

801 S. Morgan St.

Chicago, IL 60607

312-996-7353

 

The University of Illinois at Chicago Is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and Does Not Discriminate On the Basis of Race, Gender or Sex, Sexual Orientation, or Religion

Back to school!

Richard J. Daley speaks at the groundbreaking for the University of Illinois at Chicago, then called “Congress Circle” because the campus is located near the point where Congress Parkway meets the circle interchange of highways I-90, I-94, and I-290. Click on image to play video.

Video: Excerpt from “Richard J. Daley and UIC,” RJD_04_02_0000_0000_415

This clip is from one of more than 500 audio and video media items found in the Richard J. Daley Collection. These items are currently being digitized for preservation purposes, but clips from some of them can be found here at the Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit. “Use copies” for a small number of these items are currently available for viewing or listening at UIC Special Collections & University Archives. For more information, please ask a librarian or call 312-996-2742.