Introduction

Introduction

Introduction The City That Works View all topics for “The City That Works” > 1 of 3 I think [Richard J. Daley] made Chicago the most livable city in America. He paid attention. He stuck to his knitting. I use that word in our own business, too. He knew what they needed between neighborhoods, good streets, good highways, and water systems. And he did those things. He did the public works projects well. James McDonough, Commissioner of Department of Streets and Sanitation, interview excerpt, September 17, 2003   Chicago owes much of its reputation as “the city that works” to Mayor Richard J. Daley’s administration. On his watch, the city prioritized neighborhood services. It added new garbage trucks, sewers, and street and alley lighting. It reorganized and enlarged police and fire protection. It furnished cleaner water with the Central District and the South Water Filtration Plants. The mayor oversaw city beautification projects. Examples included neighborhood cleanup campaigns and construction of one of Chicago’s first bicycle paths. Daley also revitalized the downtown Loop area. He urged national and international corporations to establish headquarters there and facilitated construction of many of the buildings that have come to define the city’s skyline. Among those were the Standard Oil Building, the Hancock Building, and the Sears Tower. 2 of 3 A number of city residents felt left out, believing that some businesses, workers, or neighborhoods benefited over others. But Daley’s defenders pointed to the vitality of Chicago’s business and cultural life during his administration, especially at a time when other major cities suffered losses of business and population declines. 3 of 3 Next...
Making the City Work

Making the City Work

Making the City Work The City That Works View all topics for “The City That Works” > 1 of 12 One of his top priorities as mayor was to improve the delivery of city services to all of the neighborhoods and to all of the people of Chicago. When you look at the city’s Capital Improvement Program during his administration and the emphasis that was placed on constructing new facilities for every city department, you get a clear picture of the mayor’s priorities. As the City Architect, I had the opportunity and responsibility for the design and construction of these new facilities. New Police, Fire, Health, Senior, Community Service, Library, Streets and Sanitation, and Transit facilities were completed in neighborhoods throughout the city. All designed to improve the delivery of city services. Jerome Butler, City Architect, interview excerpt, July 8,2002 2 of 12 William Daley explains why providing city services was so important for the mayor. Click on image to play video. Video: William Daley, son of Richard J. Daley, interview excerpt, December 5, 2008 3 of 12 I think that you can see how development helps a community. That’s not only from providing amenities in that area that will serve the people long after it’s built, but also the jobs it creates to build that amenity. Patrick Thompson, grandson of Richard J. Daley, interview excerpt, June 13, 2002 This undated video shows garbage removal services from the early years of Richard J. Daley’s mayoral administration. Click on image to play video. Video: Excerpt from “Miscellaneous Footage” (no sound), RJD_04_02_0000_0000_049 4 of 12   5 of 12 Those filtration...
Building for Chicago’s People

Building for Chicago’s People

Building for Chicago's People The City That Works View all topics for “The City That Works” > 1 of 13 We want to do three things here in Chicago. We want to make Chicago an international city. We want to bring headquarters for companies in here. And we want to build Chicago for its people. Mayor Richard J. Daley, as quoted by A. Robert Abboud, First National Bank of Chicago, President, interview excerpt, December 3, 2009   I think he did a great job of building the city, turning it into a great city, and interacting with the federal government. It was building the city, getting the expressway systems built, getting O’Hare built, getting UIC built, and getting so many of the buildings downtown built. I think he did a great job of turning the city into a world class city. Robert G. Vanecko, grandson of Richard J. Daley, interview excerpt, March 5, 2010     2 of 13     A city engineer discusses building projects. Click on image to play video. Video: Robert Christensen, Executive Director Public Building Commission, interview excerpt, September 8, 2003 He helped hospitals in their plans for expansion and ways to do things. I would only find out about it sometimes because some CEO of a hospital or someone like that would tell me. “Your father-in-law was very helpful to us, getting these people to come on our board and tell us to go ahead on this.” Dr. Robert M. Vanecko, MD, son-in-law of Richard J. Daley, interview excerpt, March 8, 2010   3 of 13 4 of 13 Providing services and programs...
City Beautiful, City Cultural

City Beautiful, City Cultural

City Beautiful, City Cultural The City That Works View all topics for “The City That Works” > 1 of 11 2 of 11     The mayor was very much involved, as is his son, in beautifying the city. So he created urban beautification awards. Every year, they would give plaques to different people who had won awards. Jerome Butler, City Architect, interview excerpt, July 8,2002   3 of 11 4 of 11 We used to hand sweep the streets at night with a small crew in the downtown streets only. But it was a pretty wide area. Well, all of the visitors would come to Chicago. And these guys with the hand brooms would get between the cars. They’d get all the debris. If you went to New York, you’d see it all over. Well, people would come and they’d see all of this wonderful, cleaned up, downtown area. And they attributed it to being the same throughout it. James McDonough, Commissioner of Department of Streets and Sanitation, interview excerpt, September 17, 2003 5 of 11   6 of 11 Cleanup Parades on Chicago’s State Street. Click on the second image to play video.   Video: Excerpt from “Miscellaneous Footage” (no sound), RJD_04_02_0000_0000_049 7 of 11 Well, one man that had a big business on Michigan Avenue came to him and suggested that he’d like to donate money to the city for the beautification and did. So Dick turned to him and he said, “No, the city has the money. I’ll tell you what you can do. We have the flower boxes. The city will donate those to...
A Union Man, A Business Mayor

A Union Man, A Business Mayor

A Union Man, A Business Mayor The City That Works View all topics for “The City That Works” > 1 of 7 He was a union man. But he wasn’t a coward with the unions. I sat in meetings where he was talking with union leaders. He’d say, “No. This is not good for business.” I can remember when we’d have meetings sometimes. People would want to come in and either establish a company or build something. He would call some of the business community in. And he’d say, “Look, you tell me whether this is good for Chicago or not. I’m going to leave the room. My criteria is that if it makes jobs, I’m for it. If it doesn’t make jobs, I’m against it.” And he’d leave. We’d sit and talk. Then he’d come back. A. Robert Abboud, First National Bank of Chicago, President, interview excerpt, December 3, 2009                   2 of 7 The mayor negotiated with the Chicago Teachers Union. Click on image to play video.  Video: Ed Bedore, City Budget Director, interview excerpt, May 18, 2009 3 of 7 4 of 7   My dad had a great relationship with the business community in Chicago, and most of the people were Republicans. But he knew that for the city to be sound, you needed a good sound business community and a strong relationship with them. And they respected him and were very supportive of him on issues. They disagreed at other times, but he knew that he needed that base for different causes, whether it was the...