Loyalty in Politics

Loyalty in Politics

Loyalty in Politics Good Government Is Good Politics View all topics for “Good Government Is Good Politics” > 1 of 12 As mayor of Chicago and chairman of the Cook County Democratic Party, Daley controlled the hiring and firing of thousands of city and county employees. For some positions, proven loyalty to the Democratic Party was necessary for both getting and keeping a job. This system, in which employees were expected to vote and work for the Democratic Party, was legal, and supporters argued that it engendered hard work and loyalty to the city. However, in 1969, Michael Shakman, a candidate to the Illinois Constitutional Convention, filled a lawsuit that successfully challenged politically influenced personnel decisions. 2 of 12 Former President Jimmy Carter argues that political hiring helped the city find good workers. Click on image to play video. Video: Jimmy Carter, President of the United States 1977-1981, interview excerpt, October 17, 2014 3 of 12 He’d go out to his ward meetings on Saturday mornings; he’d have two hundred precinct captains at 37th and Halsted at the 11th Ward. And we’d pull up on the corner there. And the precinct captains would come up and say “Mr. Mayor, can you help Joe? His son needs a job.” And the mayor would say, “Have him call so and so. We’d be glad to help him out.” Vince Gavin, Security Chief for Richard J. Daley, interview excerpt, July 19, 2014   4 of 12 Former President Jimmy Carter explains that loyalty in politics ensured smooth running for city services. Click on image to play video. Video: Jimmy Carter, President of...