Goodbye, Friend

Goodbye, Friend

Goodbye, Friend Legacy View all topics for “Legacy” > 1 of 4 On December 20, 1976, Mayor Richard J. Daley died of a heart attack.   2 of 4 3 of 4     When the mayor died, it was like the end of the world. It was like having your own father die. Ray Simon, Corporation Counsel City of Chicago 1965-1969, interview excerpt, June 30, 2010   4 of 4 Next topic: University of Illinois at Chicago View all topics for Legacy > View a list of all exhibits > All Topics: Legacy Goodbye, Friend Legacy University of Illinois at Chicago Legacy Remembering the Mayor...
University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago Legacy View all topics for “Legacy” > 1 of 7 And I think his greatest contribution to the city was UIC. That was the toughest political decision. But it was the best thing. Richard M. Daley, son of Richard J. Daley, interview excerpt, March 11, 2009 2 of 7 Richard J. Daley speaks at the groundbreaking for the University of Illinois at Chicago, then called “Congress Circle” because the campus is located near the point where Congress Parkway meets the circle interchange of highways I-90, I-94, and I-290. Click on image to play video. Video: Excerpt from “Richard J. Daley and UIC,” RJD_04_02_0000_0000_415 3 of 7 Richard J. Daley speaks at an event celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Click on image to play video. Video: Excerpt from “Richard J. Daley and UIC,” RJD_04_02_0000_0000_415 4 of 7 The controversial site chosen for the university was just south and west of the downtown. Construction entailed demolition of residential housing and most buildings of the historic Hull-House settlement. He always talked about it. And then, when it came to fruition, with the protestors, it was very controversial, with the march around the house, and all that they said about my dad. It was hard. But he knew in his heart that that was good, because he loved education so much. He went to night school. He didn’t have it easy. In those days, that’s what they did. And they worked very hard. Mary Carol Vanecko, daughter of Richard J. Daley, March 5, 2009     He’d drive past when it was...
Remembering the Mayor

Remembering the Mayor

Remembering the Mayor Legacy View all topics for “Legacy” > 1 of 9 He was the right person for the job at the right time. There was a tremendous demand for housing, a demand for consumer products, and a demand for expansion, with office space and everything else. And that’s exactly as I saw Mayor Daley. That’s what he wanted to accomplish. He wanted to build Chicago. He wanted to make it better. He wanted to improve it, both through construction and through education. I think the only thing that trumped his interest in doing that was his devotion to his family. He was about as family oriented a person as I think that I have ever known. Lester Crown, Financier, interview excerpt, August 31, 2009     2 of 9 He will always be seen as one of the great mayors, who took a very complex, complicated city in an extremely difficult time and made it a model for the nation and the world. Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta, interview excerpt, October 16, 2014 I think he would like to be remembered as a man who ran a tight ship and a good city. He was proud of his Chicago. Wilson Frost, Alderman, interview excerpt, November 13, 2014     3 of 9   Daley was liberal. He had some blind sides on some things, particularly on civil rights, and issues like education, and to some extent in housing. The public high-rises were an example. He was a governmental activist. He was calling me and saying, ‘Why aren’t you doing more on transportation?’ So, you say liberal, yes...