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The road to Con-Con

Fifty years ago today, on November 18, 1969, Richard M. Daley won his first election–as delegate to the Illinois Constitutional Convention, or “Con-Con” for short. The convention drafted a new constitution for the state, and voters ratified it soon afterward. Daley went on to serve as senator in the state legislature (1973-1981), state’s attorney for Cook County (1981-1989), and mayor of Chicago (1989-2011).

First page of a voter's guide to the new Illinois Constitution, 1970

First page of a voter’s guide to the new Illinois Constitution, 1970. RJD_02_01_0093_0001_001

Remembering 1989: Mayor Richard M. Daley welcomes Lech Walesa

Lech Walesa led Solidarity, a workers’ movement that resisted Poland’s Communist government. Solidarity’s success in securing freer elections contributed to ending the Cold War.

Thirty years ago this month, in November 1989, Walesa visited the United States. He stopped in Chicago, which has one of the world’s largest populations of Polish speakers. Mayor Richard M. Daley, Governor James R. Thompson, and other officials welcomed Walesa and held a luncheon in his honor.

Lech Walesa addresses a Chicago gathering as Mayor Richard M. Daley applauds, November 18, 1989

Lech Walesa addresses a Chicago gathering as Mayor Richard M. Daley applauds, November 18, 1989. RMD_07_0062_0010_002_030A

Mayor Richard M. Daley speaks with Lech Walesa at a dinner to honor the Polish leader. Illinois Governor James R. Thompson looks on, November 18, 1989

Mayor Richard M. Daley speaks with Lech Walesa at a dinner to honor the Polish leader. Illinois Governor James R. Thompson looks on, November 18, 1989. RMD_07_0062_0010_003_017A

A little more than a year after this visit, Walesa was elected president of Poland.

Bill Daley’s UIC’s Wiewel Lecture on Economic Development

(Reposted from UICToday. “Daley: It’s ‘good business’ for business to be a good social partner“: October 28, 2019, updated October 29, 2019. For UIC’s announcement about the lecture, see “William ‘Bill’ Daley to discuss roles of corporations in society as he donates papers to UIC” To research the collection, please visit the finding aid (inventory list) for the William D. Daley papers)

William “Bill” Daley presents the Wiewel Lecture on economic development in UIC’s Academic and Residential Complex

William “Bill” Daley presents the Wiewel Lecture on economic development in UIC’s Academic and Residential Complex. Photo: Joshua Clark

Between the time that William “Bill” Daley served as President Bill Clinton’s secretary of commerce and when he served as President Barack Obama’s chief of staff, the internet had taken over the world and completely changed the way business and politics were conducted.

Daley, who gave the Wiewel Lecture on Economic Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago on Oct. 23, tapped into his extensive background at the crossroads of business and politics to speak to about 100 people, including students, faculty, elected officials and family members.

In his lecture, “Corporations & Humanity: Why They Belong Together,” Daley focused on how the role of corporations had shifted because of technology and the rise in social media that made companies — as well as political leaders — more accountable more quickly.

read more…

Remembering 1989: Mayor Richard M. Daley announces “GreenStreets” program

Thirty years ago today, on October 26, 1989, Mayor Richard M. Daley announced Chicago’s new “GreenStreets” program. The goal of the program was to add a half million trees to what “Chicago’s urban forest.” On the day of the announcement, Daley chipped in, helping plant a tree on the 8100 south block of Marquette.

Mayor Richard M. Daley plants a tree for Chicago's GreenStreets program, October 26, 1989

Mayor Richard M. Daley plants a tree for Chicago’s GreenStreets program, October 26, 1989. RMD_07_0061_0019_005_033

Source consulted

“Mayor Daley kicks off ‘GreenStreets,’ Chicago’s tree planting program,” October 26, 1989. Richard M. Daley papers, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. Box 3-3, folder 24.

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Prime Minister Terence O’Neill of Ireland

On October 14, 1963, Mayor Richard J. Daley dined with the prime minister of Ireland, Terence O’Neill. The inscription on the photograph, written by Bishop Cletus O’Donnell (seated at the left of the image) reads: “Your Honor – a remembrance of your grand party for the Prime Minister of Ireland on the evening of October 14, 1963.”

A dinner party held in honor of the Prime Minister of Ireland. Seated from left to right: Bishop Cletus O'Donnell, Prime Minister Terence O'Neill, and Mayor Richard J. Daley, October 14, 1963

A dinner party held in honor of the Prime Minister of Ireland. Seated from left to right: Bishop Cletus O’Donnell, Prime Minister Terence O’Neill, and Mayor Richard J. Daley, October 14, 1963. RJD_04_01_0048_0010_001

A Chicago landmark: the Aon Center, formerly Standard Oil Building

The Aon Center, originally called the Standard Oil building, is one of the tallest skyscrapers in Chicago.

Chicago  Mayor Richard J. Daley inspects the plans

Mayor Richard J. Daley and John Swearingen, President of Standard Oil, view an architectural model of the Standard Oil Building (now Aon Center), circa 1967

Mayor Richard J. Daley and John Swearingen, President of Standard Oil, view an architectural model of the Standard Oil Building (now Aon Center), circa 1967. RJD_04_01_0026_0020_001

Groundbreaking!

Mayor Richard J. Daley and John Swearingen, President of Standard Oil, stand next to an architectural model of the Standard Oil Building (now Aon Center) at the groundbreaking ceremony for that building. Two unidentified men are behind them at the right, 1967

Mayor Richard J. Daley and John Swearingen, President of Standard Oil, stand next to an architectural model of the Standard Oil Building (now Aon Center) at the groundbreaking ceremony for that building. Two unidentified men are behind them at the right, 1967. RJD_04_01_0026_0020_002

Architectural drawings

Architectural rendering of the Aon Center Plaza showing a square pool with fountains and flags of the fifty states, circa 1970s

Architectural rendering of the Aon Center Plaza showing a square pool with fountains and flags of the fifty states, circa 1970s. RJD_04_01_0038_0013_002

Architectural rendering of the Aon Center Plaza on Randolph Street, showing the work "Sounding Sculpture" by Harry Bertoia with cascades of water around the ventilating elements, circa 1970s

Architectural rendering of the Aon Center Plaza on Randolph Street, showing the work “Sounding Sculpture” by Harry Bertoia with cascades of water around the ventilating elements, circa 1970s. RJD_04_01_0038_0013_001

Remembering 1989: Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first international visit as mayor

Thirty years ago this month, from September 13 through September 25, 1989, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley visited the United Kingdom and to the Republic of Ireland.

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley chats with a security guard outside the building of the Lord Mayor of London, September 1989

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley chats with a security guard outside the building of the Lord Mayor of London, September 1989. RMD_07_006_0018_009_031

The main purpose of this visit, the first of what was to be many international trips during his 22-year tenure as mayor, was to promote Chicago business.

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley speaks with diners at Windy City Bar and Grill, a Chicago-themed restaurant in London, United Kingdom, September 1989

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley speaks with diners at Windy City Bar and Grill, a Chicago-themed restaurant in London, United Kingdom, September 1989. RMD_07_006_0018_011_002A

Another reason for this trip was personal. Mayor Daley visited the homeland of his ancestors in Ireland.

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley greets well-wishers during his visit to Cork County, Ireland, September 1989

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley greets well-wishers during his visit to Cork County, Ireland, September 1989. RMD_07_006_0018_001_012A

Remembering 1989: Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago

This month, September 2019, marks the thirtieth anniversary of the “Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago,” a report commissioned by Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Cover page to the Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago, 1989

Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago, 1989, cover page. RMD_01_0014_0003_CoverPage

Background

While campaigning for mayor, Daley had promised to “invite local businesses, universities and foundations with a commitment to Chicago to ‘loan’ their expertise to city government.” In an effort to fulfill that promise, Daley secured the help of the firm Jasculca/Terman and Associates, which agreed to donate its resources to study the public information functions of 45 city agencies and the mayor’s press office.

When the report was released, the mayor praised the Jasculca/Terman “for donating this valuable study.” He also stressed the importance of the city’s public information function:

Public information is among the most important services government provides. After all, the very best health care, education and police proteciton in the world will not be effective if the public doesn’t k now how to take advantage of it.

The executive summary:

The report found a number of inefficiencies in the city’s public information functions and made recommendations for fixing those inefficiencies.

The two excerpts below include the executive summary of the audit. Click on each page to magnify its contents.

Public Information Audit for the city of Chicago, 1989, first page of executive summary

Public Information Audit for the city of Chicago, 1989, first page of executive summary. RMD_01_0014_0003_006

Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago, 1989, second page of executive summary

Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago, 1989, second page of executive summary. RMD_01_0014_0003_007

The full audit may be viewed in the Special Collections and University Archives reading room at the Richard J. Daley Library, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Ask a librarian for more information or to make an appointment.

Sources consulted

Chicago. “Public Information Audit for the City of Chicago, prepared by Jasulca/Terman and Associates, Inc.,” 1989. Richard M. Daley papers, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. Box 1-14, folder 3.

“Mayor’s remarks: Public Information Audit,” September 11, 1989. Richard M. Daley papers, Special Collections and  University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. Box 3-2, folder 6.

“The Daley Agenda for Chicago’s Future,” circa 1988. Richard M. Daley papers, Special Collections and  University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. Box 1-7, folder 1.

Back to school!

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, and most of his children, attended De La Salle Institute.

Drawing of De La Salle Institute school buildings and adjacent football field. The original building (demolished 1984).

Drawing of De La Salle Institute school buildings and adjacent football field. The original building (demolished 1984) was located at East 35th Street and South Wabash Avenue. A new school building now stands on this site. RJD_04_01_0004_0009_007

Serving the public as county clerk

Richard J. Daley served the public in a number of positions, including clerk of Cook County. Daley held that position from 1950 until 1955, when he became mayor of Chicago.

Cook County Clerk Richard J. Daley assists a woman from behind an office counter, August 21, 1952

Cook County Clerk Richard J. Daley assists a woman from behind an office counter, August 21, 1952. Photo credit: A-Accurate Photo. RJD_04_01_0010_0005_003

Fishing derby!

Mayor Richard J. Daley sits on a boat in Lake Michigan during a Chicago Park District fish derby. Senator Richard M. Daley is behind him. Alderman Michael Bilandic is at the left, circa 1972-1976

Mayor Richard J. Daley sits on a boat in Lake Michigan during a Chicago Park District fish derby. Senator Richard M. Daley is behind him. Alderman Michael Bilandic is at the left, circa 1972-1976. Photo: Laszlo Kondor. MSLASZ13_0003_0004_038

Celebrating the moon landing

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the first landing on the moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts. After the astronauts’ return to earth, Chicago honored them with a parade downtown.

A large banner saying "That's One Small Step for a Man One Giant Leap for Mankind" hangs over a City Hall entranceway on LaSalle Street. A group of people are sitting on the curb waiting along the parade route, August 13, 1969

A large banner saying “That’s One Small Step for a Man One Giant Leap for Mankind” hangs over a City Hall entranceway on LaSalle Street. A group of people are sitting on the curb waiting along the parade route, August 13, 1969. RJD_04_01_0052_0006_011

As many as two million spectators may have witnessed it, according to Police Superintendent James B. Conlisk.

Michael Kilian and John MacLean, of the Chicago Tribune, described the parade:

It was more than a parade, it was glory. The brilliant blue sky was filled with ticker tape that seemed without source, streets and avenues were no longer thorofares [sic] but masses of humanity, and the cheers, the sirens, the ringing bells created so great a din that no other sound could be heard.

Apollo 11 astronaut parade crowd to celebrate landing of first man on the moon, August 13, 1969

Apollo 11 astronaut parade crowd to celebrate landing of first man on the moon, August 13, 1969. RJD_04_01_0052_0006_013

Mayor Richard J. Daley speaks from the podium at a ceremony in Civic Center plaza to honor Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, and Michael Collins, August 13, 1969

Mayor Richard J. Daley speaks from the podium at a ceremony in Civic Center plaza to honor Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, and Michael Collins, August 13, 1969. RJD_04_01_0052_0006_017

Source consulted

Michael Kilian and John Maclean, “Wild Acclaim for Heroes,” Chicago Tribune, August 14, 1969, p. N1.

Royal Chicago [UPDATED]

Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley admire a painting portraying them with Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Chicago in 1959

Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley admire a painting portraying them with Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Chicago in 1959. RJD_04_01_0042_0001_077

The painting depicted in this image is part of the Richard J. Daley collection at the University of Illinois at Chicago Library. To learn more about the collection, please see the Daley Family Collections research guide, or Ask a Librarian. Also, check out the 2018 blog post Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to Chicago sixty years ago on July 6, 1959.

UPDATE

UIC library has opened a new exhibit to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s visit. It is located on the second floor of the Richard J. Daley Library, and will be open to the public until September:

Exhibit to commemorate the Queen's visit to Chicago. Summer 2019

Exhibit to commemorate the Queen’s visit to Chicago. Summer 2019.

Remembering 1989: Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first Taste of Chicago appearance

Today marks the 30th anniversary of Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first appearance at the city’s annual Taste of Chicago event.

Mayor Richard M. Daley enjoys corn on the cob at the Taste of Chicago event, June 27, 1989

Mayor Richard M. Daley enjoys corn on the cob at the Taste of Chicago event, June 27, 1989. RMD_07_0059_0001_004_012A

The event had begun in 1980 under Mayor Jane Byrne and at that time had featured more than forty Chicago-area restaurants and lasted one day. By 1989, when Daley became mayor, seventy-seven restaurants were represented, and the event itself ran from June 27 through July 4.

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley greets visitors to the Taste of Chicago event, June 27, 1989

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley greets visitors to the Taste of Chicago event, June 27, 1989. RMD_07_0059_0001_005_018A

On the day of the event, Mayor Daley said:

I can’t think of any other place I’d rather be than here at our great Taste of Chicago food fair. There’s music, fu, an dmore than 70 restaurants are here to take your order! We expect more than a milion people to come out Monday for our special Fourth of July fireworks display and concert featuring the Grant Park Symphony.

Sources consulted

Lewis, Antoine. “Taste also whets the other senses.” Chicago Tribune. June 28, 1989, p. 3.

“Remarks: Mayor Daley Opens Taste of Chicago,” Richard M. Daley papers, University of Illinois at Chicago, series 3, box 3-2, folder 10.

Tackett, Michael. “Du Jour.” Chicago Tribune. June 30, 1989, p. C1.

Vettel, Phil. “Taste if full of don’t-miss eating delights.” Chicago Tribune. June 28, 1989, p. 20.

Remembering 1989: Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley leads the Gay Pride Parade

Thirty years ago today, on June 25, 1989, and only two months after being sworn in as mayor of Chicago, Richard M. Daley led the city’s gay pride parade. He was not the first Chicago mayor to participate, as Harold Washington (1983-1987) had attended while he was mayor. However, the local newspapers credited Mayor Daley as being the first to actually lead the parade.

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, seated in car, greets a well wisher at the city's gay pride parade, June 25, 1989

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, seated in car, greets a well wisher at the city’s gay pride parade, June 25, 1989. RMD_07_0058_0026_003_013

Sources consulted

Griffin, Jean Latz. “Mayoral Hopefuls Support Gay Voters.” Chicago Tribune. February 5, 1987, page 1.

Page, Clarence. “Dealing with Gay Parades.” Chicago Tribune. July 7, 1985, page 3.

Rotenberk, Lori. “Daley is first mayor to lead gays’ parade.” Chicago Sun-Times. June 26, 1989, page 3. Newsbank. <https://infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/news/openurl?ctx_ver=z39.882004&rft_id=info%3Asid/infoweb.newsbank.com&svc_dat=AWNB&req_dat=0FD3D1C913B1A06F&rft_val_format=info%3Aofi/fmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Actx&rft_dat=document_id%3Anews%252F0EB36E660D6EB884> Paywall may apply. Accessed May 17, 2019.

Seigel, Jessica. “Daley’s support is inspiration to gay pride parade.” Chicago Tribune. June 26, 1989, page D1 and D3.

Centennial of Richard J. Daley’s high school graduation

Today, June 16, 2019, marks the 100th anniversary of Richard J. Daley’s graduation from his high school, De La Salle Institute. Daley later went on to become Chicago’s second longest-serving mayor, from 1955 to 1976. His record was surpassed only by his son, Richard M. Daley, who served from 1989 to 2011.

Richard J. Daley with his senior class at De La Salle Institute (3rd row, 4th from right)

Richard J. Daley with his senior class at De La Salle Institute (3rd row, 4th from right). RJD_04_01_0043_0009_002

Remembering those who served

Unidentified military man, West German Chancellor Willy Brandt, and Mayor Richard J. Daley at Eternal Flame in Civic Center Plaza, 1973

Unidentified military man, West German Chancellor Willy Brandt, and Mayor Richard J. Daley at Eternal Flame in Civic Center Plaza, 1973. Photo: Laszlo Kondor. MSLASZ13_0001_0004_003

Baseball season in Chicago! Two teams, one mayor

Mayor Richard J. Daley prepares to throw out a baseball to start a game, as two baseball players, one in a Sox uniform and the other in a Chicago Cubs uniform, look on, circa 1950s

Mayor Richard J. Daley prepares to throw out a baseball to start a game, as two baseball players, one in a Sox uniform and the other in a Chicago Cubs uniform, look on, circa 1950s. RJD_04_01_0042_0001_103

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley visits Europe (1964)

Leaving for Europe

Fifty-five years ago this month, in May 1964, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and his wife, Eleanor “Sis” Daley, visited Europe. They accompanied other American politicians on parts of this visit, including Wisconsin Governor John Reynolds and Minnesota Governor Karl H. Rolvaag. They left for Copenhagen, Denmark on the inaugural Scandinavian Airlines direct flight from Chicago, arriving May 1.

Inaugural SAS flight to Copenhagen and Ireland, Eleanor and Richard J. Daley and others, 1964

Inaugural SAS flight to Copenhagen and Ireland, Eleanor and Richard J. Daley and others, 1964. Metro News Photo, RJD_04_01_0023_0005_001

Itineraries

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 1., 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 1., 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_003

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 2, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 2, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_004

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 3, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 3, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_005

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 4, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 4, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_006

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 5, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 5, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_007

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 6, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 6, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_006

The grand tour (selected images)

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with Pope Paul VI, 1964

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with Pope Paul VI, 1964. Pontificia Fotografia Felici, photographer. RJD_04_01_0049_0001_007

Eleanor "Sis" Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley visit the grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France, 1964

Eleanor “Sis” Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley visit the grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0005_016

Eleanor Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley meet the Lord Mayor of London, Alderman Clement Harman at Mansion House, 1964

Eleanor Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley meet the Lord Mayor of London, Alderman Clement Harman at Mansion House, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0005_020

 

Last stop: “Ireland, of course”

Chicago’s director of special events, Colonel “Jack” Reilly, accompanied Mayor and Mrs. Daley on the trip to Europe. When a reporter for the Chicago Tribune asked where the the Mayor’s last stop would be, Reilly answered, “Heaven.” He clarified: “Ireland, of course.”

Colonel Jack Reilly (left foreground) and others at a candlelight event during a trip to Ireland, 1964

Colonel Jack Reilly (left foreground) and others at a candlelight event during a trip to Ireland, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0012_003

Irish dignitaries

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley with Mayor of Dungarvan, Ireland, Andy Minihan, 1964

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley with Mayor of Dungarvan, Ireland, Andy Minihan, 1964. Colm O’Byrne, photographer. RJD_04_01_0023_0012_008

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley outside with Irish President Eamon de Valera at his home, 1964

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley outside with Irish President Eamon de Valera at his home, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0011_004

Relatives of late United States President John F. Kennedy

Trip to Ireland, Richard J. and Eleanor Daley with relatives of John F. Kennedy and others, 1964

Trip to Ireland, Richard J. and Eleanor Daley with relatives of John F. Kennedy and others, 1964. Colm O’Byrne, photographer. RJD_04_01_0023_0012_014

County Waterford

Mayor Daley’s paternal and maternal ancestors had hailed from County Waterford. In the section of Waterford called Old Parish, Mayor and Mrs. Daley received a warm welcome.

Mayor Richard J. Daley speaks at an Old Parish event to commemorate him during his visit to Ireland. Eleanor "Sis" Daley is among those seated on the dais, 1964

Mayor Richard J. Daley speaks at an Old Parish event to commemorate him during his visit to Ireland. Eleanor “Sis” Daley is among those seated on the dais, 1964. RJD_04_01_0042_0001_034

Local officials unveiled this plaque:

This plantation containing ten acres was financed by the contributions of some friends and associates of Richard J. Daley Mayor of Chicago, to whose honour it is dedicated. A.D. 1959

Unveiling of the Daley family homestead monument at Monameean during Daley's trip to Ireland, 1964

Unveiling of the Daley family homestead monument at Monameean during Daley’s trip to Ireland, 1964. R. Wiley, photographer. RJD_04_01_0023_0013_018

More photographs

See more images from Mayor Richard J. Daley’s 1964 trip to Europe

These photographs come from the Richard J. Daley Collection, housed in the Special Collections and University Archives of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library. Most of the photographs in this collection have been digitized and are available online in the Richard J. Daley Era Photograph Collection. For questions about the photographs or about making an appointment to visit UIC Special Collections, feel free to Ask a Librarian.

Sources consulted

“Newspaper Clippings–Trip to Ireland, 1964,” box SVB17, folder 4. Richard J. Daley Collection, University of Illinois at Chicago Library.

Doyle, James. “5,000 Cheer Daleys in Ancestral Home,” Chicago Tribune, May 19, 1964, p. 9.

Morgan, Gwen. “Daley Pleads for Home Rule from London!” Chicago Tribune, May 16, 1964, p. 2.

Richard J. Daley collection, University of Illinois at Chicago Library.

Remembering 1989: Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first inauguration

Thirty years ago today, on April 24, 1989, Richard M. Daley was sworn in as Chicago’s mayor for the first of what would be six terms in office. This photograph comes from the Richard M. Daley papers, the processed portions of which are open to researchers. Please see the Daley Family research guide for more information.

Scene from Mayor Richard M. Daley's first inauguration, with a copy of the inaugural program

Scene from Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first inauguration, with a copy of the inaugural program. RMD_01_313_0007_001

Sixty years since Richard J. Daley’s first re-election as mayor

Today marks Mayor Richard J. Daley’s first re-election as mayor on April 7, 1959.

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley stands next to stack of petitions to place his name for re-election, 1959.

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley stands next to stack of petitions to place his name for re-election, 1959. RJD_04_01_0015_0003_013

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley jokes with a supporter during a re-election campaign, 1959

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley jokes with a supporter during a re-election campaign, 1959. RJD_04_01_0015_0003_003

Daley’s victory was huge. He garnered more than 777,000 votes while his Republican opponent, Tim Sheehan, polled only around 312,000.

Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley greet well-wishers at the mayor's inauguration for his second term, 1959

Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley greet well-wishers at the mayor’s inauguration for his second term, 1959. RJD_04_01_0015_0005_006

Work consulted

Tagge, George. “Daley Elected by 465,000,” Chicago Tribune, April 8, 1959, p. 1.

Remembering 1989: Richard M. Daley elected mayor of Chicago

On this date in 1989, Richard M. Daley won election as Chicago’s 54th mayor. He went on to serve a total of six terms, stepping down in 2011.

Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Mayor Richard M. Daley. RMD_07_0057_0002_003.

This photograph comes from the Richard M. Daley Papers, the processed portions of which are open to the public. For more information on doing research in the Richard M. Daley Papers, the Richard J. Daley Collection, and related collections, please see our research guide for the Daley Family Collections.

Happy election day!

Richard J. Daley stands in front of a voting booth on election day, flanked by his father Michael J. Daley and wife Eleanor "Sis" Daley, 1955

Richard J. Daley stands in front of a voting booth on election day, flanked by his father Michael J. Daley and wife Eleanor “Sis” Daley, 1955. RJD_04_01_0012_0002_018

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Valentine's Day event at City Hall with Mayor Richard J. Daley.

Valentine’s Day event at City Hall. Photo Laszlo Kondor. MSLASZ13_0002_0015_019

A stroll on a cold day

Col. Jack Riley, Illinois governor Dan Walker, Mayor Richard J. Daley, Senator Charles Percy, and others walking outside in winter.

Col. Jack Riley, Illinois governor Dan Walker, Mayor Richard J. Daley, Senator Charles Percy, and others walking outside in winter. Photo: Laszlo Kondor. MSLASZ13_0003_0003_001

Featuring: the Martin H. Kennelly Papers

UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds the papers of Martin H. Kennelly, who served as Chicago’s mayor from 1947 to 1955. During his time in office, Kennelly gained a reputation for honesty and for running a businesslike administration.

Portrait of Mayor Martin Kennelly

Martin Kennelly, ca. 1950s. RJD_04_01_0009_0007_014

Kennelly maintained ties with his fellow Democrats nationally and locally.

Mayor Martin Kennelly speaks at a Truman campaign event, ca. 1948

Mayor Martin Kennelly speaks at a Truman campaign event, ca. 1948. RJD_04_01_0001_0012_005

11th Ward Picnic, Richard J. Daley and Martin Kennelly, August 21, 1949

11th Ward Picnic, Richard J. Daley and Martin Kennelly, August 21, 1949. RJD_04_01_0002_0010_007

Mayor Martin Kennelly, Richard J. Daley, and John Mortimer display newspapers after the mayor's re-election

Mayor Martin Kennelly, Richard J. Daley, and John Mortimer display newspapers after the mayor’s re-election, 1951. RJD_04_01_0010_0002_009

In 1955, Richard J. Daley, who was Cook County Clerk at the time, ran against Kennelly for the Democratic Party’s nomination for mayor. Kennelly lost, and Daley went on to win the mayor’s race that year.

In his inaugural address, Daley thanked the outgoing mayor:

I want to express the appreciation and admiration which I know all the people of Chicago have for the administration of Martin Kennelly. He will always be remembered as a mayor who made important contributions to his city.

The Martin H. Kennelly Papers holds more than 130 linear feet of materials and consists primarily of speeches, correspondence, and newspaper clippings from Kennelly’s three mayoral campaigns and his eight years in office. The collection is open to the public and researchers may access them by visiting UIC Special Collections and University Archives in the Richard J. Daley Library.

Sources consulted

Daley, Richard J. “Inaugural Address of Richard J. Daley, Mayor.” Richard J. Daley Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. Series 1, subseries 1, box 21, folder 4.

Martin H. Kennelly Papers, finding aid. <https://findingaids.library.uic.edu/sc/MSKenn77.xml>. Accessed January 17, 2019.

Richard J. Daley Era Photographs (University of Illinois at Chicago). CARLI digital collections. <http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/uic_rjdaley>. Accessed January 17, 2019.

No place like home

Eighty years ago, Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley moved into their home in Bridgeport, the Chicago neighborhood where they had both grown up. The Daleys purchased two lots of land and had the house built quickly. “On August 15 we broke ground. We moved in on November 15,” Eleanor recalled in an oral history interview she gave on July 18, 2002 [PDF].

Image of the Daley family home in Bridgeport

The Daley family home in Bridgeport. Photo: László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0002_0003_002

Mayor Richard J. and Eleanor "Sis" Daley outside their home on St. Patrick's Day, circa 1972-1976.

Mayor Richard J. and Eleanor “Sis” Daley outside their home on St. Patrick’s Day, circa 1972-1976. Photo László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0004_0011_024

Source

Interview with Eleanor “Sis” Daley, July 18, 2002 [PDF]. Richard J. Daley Oral History Collection, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Featuring: the Edmund Kasper Jarecki Papers at UIC

Edmund Kasper Jarecki (1879-1966) served Chicago in a number of capacities. In 1908 he represented what was then the city’s 16th Ward. From 1914 to 1920, he served as judge of the municipal court. In 1922 he won election to the Cook County court, where he stayed for more than 30 years and earned a reputation as a champion for honesty in city elections.

Cook County Clerk Richard J. Daley administers the oath of office to Judge Edmund Kasper Jarecki in 1954.

Cook County Clerk Richard J. Daley administers the oath of office to Judge Edmund Kasper Jarecki. RJD_04_01_0008_0004_020.

Upon Jarecki’s retirement in 1954, the Cook County Democratic Party noted his “outstanding ability, unimpeachable integrity and unquestioned honesty” in a resolution commending him for his years of service.

The University of Illinois at Chicago houses Judge Jarecki’s papers. The materials in this collection document the judge’s many years of service as well as aspects of his personal life. See the finding aid (inventory list) for the Edmund Kasper Jarecki Papers for more information.

Note: Quotation comes from the Richard J. Daley Collection, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. Box SIss1B18, folder 1.

Thanksgiving!

Card says "Happy Thanksgiving"
A Thanksgiving Day card from friends to the Daley family. From the Richard J. Daley Collection, RJD_04_01_0028_0012_002c.

Before he was mayor

Eighty years ago today, Richard J. Daley won election to the Illinois State Senate after serving one term in the state’s house of representatives. In the image below, Daley stands to the right with his fellow senators.

Richard J. Daley's first session in the Illinois Senate.

Richard J. Daley’s first session in the Illinois Senate. Daley is standing on the right. RJD_04_01_0001_0003_003

For more images from the Richard J. Daley Collection, see the Richard J. Daley Era Photographs.

Time to vote!

Eleanor "Sis" Daley speaks with Richard J. Daley at a voting booth.

Primary election day, Richard J. and Eleanor “Sis” Daley at a voting booth

UIC Special Collections and University Archives at the Daley Library closed to researchers through January 13, 2019

UIC Special Collections and University Archives in the Richard J. Daley Library is closed for equipment and storage upgrades from Thursday, October 18, 2018 to January 13, 2019. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your patience.

Limited online reference service will still be available, but we may not be able to honor requests for photocopies, scans, or digital reproductions.

Researchers are also welcome to use our many online resources by visiting the UIC Image Collections.

UIC students share what they learned using the Richard J. Daley Collection

UIC students from the "City at a Crossroads" seminar with Lecturer David Greenstein.

UIC students from the “City at a Crossroads” seminar with Lecturer David Greenstein.

In this video clip, UIC Honors College students from the University Library’s seminar entitled “City at a Crossroads: Local, National and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968” share what they learned using the Richard J. Daley Collection. Taught by Lecturer David Greenstein, the class gives students the opportunity to ask and answer their own questions about local/national/global connections, race and urban space, social movements and political campaigns. Classes take place in the Special Collections department, allowing students the opportunity to discover and analyze primary documents in a collaborative setting. Assignments and activities introduce students to working with archival records, interpreting primary documents, developing research questions that can be addressed with available materials and explaining the results of their research. In addition to discussing issues that still face Chicago and the nation, students gain skills in critical thinking, interpreting evidence and producing effective arguments.

Watch student interviews

Queen Elizabeth II visits Chicago 59 years ago today

On July 6, 1959, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom visited Chicago to commemorate the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway, which facilitated international, waterborne trade via the Saint Lawrence River and the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada.

Map of docking area for Queen Elizabeth II's arrival in Chicago

Map of docking area for Queen Elizabeth II’s arrival in Chicago, 1959. RJD_01_02_0003_0010_008

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley welcomed the Queen. See a brief film of her arrival below.

During her stay, the Queen and Prince Philip visited the Chicago International Trade Fair.

Richard J. Daley, Queen Elizabeth II, and Prince Phillip tour the International Trade Fair

Richard J. Daley, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, and others tour the International Trade Fair in Chicago, 1959. Photo: Pics Chicago. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_006

One highlight of the Queen’s stay was the banquet that Chicago and Mayor Daley held in her honor.

Mayor Daley and Queen Elizabeth II walk to banquet in the Queen's honor,

Mayor Daley and Queen Elizabeth II walk to banquet in the Queen’s honor, 1959. Photo: R. E. Murphy. RJD_04_01_0045_0011_027

Banquet for Queen Elizabeth II at Conrad Hilton Hotel, 1959. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_011

Banquet for Queen Elizabeth II at Conrad Hilton Hotel, 1959. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_011

Announcing the 2018 Short-Term Travel and UIC Graduate Student Fellowship Recipients

In early May 2018, Short-Term Travel Fellowships were awarded to four individuals studying at universities across the United States. In addition, University of Illinois at Chicago Graduate Student Fellowships were awarded to two UIC scholars.

The Short-Term Travel Fellowship gives individual researchers, teachers and writers of any nationality who live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area the opportunity to travel to UIC to conduct research using special collections and university archives. The UIC Graduate Student Fellowship is open to UIC students who are enrolled in a graduate degree program and conducting research in subject areas related to the Library’s strong special collections in the history of Chicago.

For a complete list of the Library’s holdings, visit library.uic.edu/special-collections-university-archives.

Congratulations to the 2018 fellows!

UIC Library Short-Term Travel Fellowship awardees

Amy Zenoni, Ph.D. candidate, History
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
Poor Health: Retrenchment and Resistance in Chicago’s Public Hospital

Melanie Newport, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of U.S. History, Affiliated Faculty in American Studies, Urban and Community Studies
University of Connecticut-Hartford
Community of the Condemned

Eric Fure-Slocum, Ph.D, Associate Professor of History
St. Olaf College
Losing Hope: Workers’ Disengagement in Metropolitan America

Amani Morrison, Ph.D. candidate, African American and African Diaspora Studies
University of California-Berkeley
Kitchenette Building: A Cultural History

UIC Library Graduate Student Fellowship awardees

Maureen Heffern Ponicki, Ph.D. candidate, Political Science
Deindustrialization in America’s Rust Belt: Urban Governance that Builds Inclusive Resiliency

Sara O’Neill Kohl, Ph.D. candidate, Urban Planning and Policy
What Happened to Fighting Back? The Rise and Fall of Industrial Policy and the Making of Economic Development

Interested in applying?
Details will be forthcoming about the next application cycle for UIC Library Fellowships program on library.uic.edu.

Thank you!
The UIC Library’s Graduate Student and Short-Term Travel Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Happy Birthday, Richard J. Daley

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

UIC Richard J. Daley Special Collections Research Award

Each year, the UIC University Library offers local area high school students the University of Illinois at Chicago Richard J. Daley Special Collections Research Award as part of the Chicago Metro History Fair. The award is generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee. A $300 prize is given to the high school student who best uses the Library’s Special Collections and University Archives resources, either at the Richard J. Daley Library or the Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago. This year’s topic for the History Fair was Conflict and Compromise in History.

Congratulations to the 2017-2018 winner!
Leslye Calvillo

Prosser Career Academy
The Jane Collective: How Jane Illegally Provided Safe Abortions

Students work on projects throughout the academic year and the winners are recognized each spring.

Learn more about the Chicago Metro History Fair

UIC receives papers of longest-serving Chicago mayor, Richard M. Daley

The University of Illinois at Chicago is proud to announce that former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley has chosen to make UIC’s Richard J. Daley Library the repository for a large collection of papers and artifacts amassed during his 22-year mayoral tenure.

Daley’s donated papers are now available to researchers and students in the Special Collections and University Archives of his father’s namesake library. A ceremony held Tuesday at UIC honored the donation, the anniversary of his first inauguration as mayor on April 24, 1989, and celebrated his 76th birthday.

“This donation by the Hon. Richard M. Daley reinforces the Daley family’s commitment to UIC. The papers of Richard M. Daley are important source materials documenting the evolution of Chicago as a global urban center,” UIC Chancellor Michael Amiridis said.

“The documents are also important primary sources that will serve to provide integral educational opportunities to students and researchers who may want to study the history of Chicago. We are honored that the Daley family has continued to entrust UIC to be the caretakers of their archives telling the story of one of the most important families of our city.”

Read the full release
View the finding aid

 

Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley in front of a desk that he and his father used in City Hall. The desk is part of the collection donated to UIC. (Photo: Jenny Fontaine)

Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley in front of a desk that he and his father used in City Hall. The desk is part of the collection donated to UIC. (Photo: Jenny Fontaine)

William and John Daley visit City at a Crossroads class

In April 2018, former White House Chief of Staff William M. Daley and Cook County Board Commissioner John P. Daley spoke to students of the City at a Crossroads: Local, National and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968 Honors College seminar about the tumultuous political and social climate in Chicago during the 60s and 70s. The Daleys shared their personal experiences of the key events of the time as well as insights about their father, the late Mayor Richard J. Daley. The students had an opportunity to discuss with the Daleys how the societal issues of the past compare to today’s. Classes are held in the Special Collections Reading Room of the library so students can examine primary documents from the Richard J. Daley Collection to conduct research. Taught by Visiting Lecturer David Greenstein, the class gives students the opportunity to ask and answer their own questions about local/national/global connections, race, urban space, social movements and political campaigns.

William M. Daley speaks to students of City at a Crossroads: Local, National, and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968 about his experiences in Chicago during the late 1960s.

William M. Daley speaks to students of City at a Crossroads: Local, National, and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968 about his experiences in Chicago during the late 1960s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John P. Daley with students of the City at a Crossroads seminar.

John P. Daley with students of the City at a Crossroads seminar.

UIC Library’s mosaic portrait of Richard J. Daley on display at the National Museum of Mexican Art

In 1964, architect, artist and designer Genaro Álvarez created an amethyst stone mosaic portrait of Mayor Richard J. Daley with the city’s “I Will” spirit arising from the Great Chicago Fire in the background. This tribute portrait was displayed for about one month at the Mexican Tourist Bureau, in City Hall and finally at the Chicago Press Club library with other works by Álvarez before it was donated to the UIC Richard J. Daley Library.

Álvarez regularly integrated protruding precious stones into his mosaic murals and Venetian style portraits of historic leaders. He named this practice “coarse topography.”

The “I Will” mural is on display at the National Museum of Mexican Art through August 2018 as part of the exhibition, Arte Diseño Xicágo: Mexican Inspiration from the World’s Columbian Exposition to the Civil Rights Era, as well as the Art Design Chicago citywide celebration of Chicago’s art and design history.

Learn more

 

"I Will" mosaic of Richard J. Daley by artist Genaro Álvarez.

“I Will” mosaic of Richard J. Daley by artist Genaro Álvarez.

UIC Library Special Collections Graduate Student Fellowships 2018-2019 Deadline Extended

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library is offering Graduate Student Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives.

Special Collections at the Richard J. Daley Library houses manuscripts, rare books, photographs, and artifacts on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents the city’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. Premier collections include the papers of Richard J. Daley, the Chicago Urban League, the Century of Progress, exemplars of 21st century design, and the Chicago settlement house movement. More information is available at library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

An interdisciplinary committee will review the applications, and selections will be announced in early May 2018.  Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS EXTENDED: January 31, 2018

AWARD CYCLE:  The UIC academic year begins August 16 and ends August 15.  For this awards cycle, projects may begin any time after acceptance in May 2018 and end by August 15, 2019.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to graduate students enrolled in graduate degree programs at UIC. All academic disciplines are eligible. Preference is given to applicants who plan to use UIC political manuscript collections. Past UIC Special Collections fellows are eligible.

AWARD: $2,000 for one semester during the 2017/18 or 2018/19 academic years. The Fellowship does not include a tuition waiver. The stipend will be paid in one installment one at the beginning of the fellowship semester.

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report. Fellows may be invited to give a presentation on their research.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter that includes a title and description of your research project and preferred semester of the fellowship.
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words): Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use in the UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.
  3. Proposed outcome of research such as a paper, thesis, etc. (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project.
  4. Curriculum vitae.
  5. Letter of recommendation from your advisor evaluating your proposed project.  The letter may be sent separately, but in your application please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person who will be writing the recommendation.

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources
The University of Illinois at Chicago
uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

For questions, please contact lib-fellowships@uic.edu.

The UIC Library Special Collections Graduate Student Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Application Information PDF

UIC Library Special Collections Short-Term Travel Fellowships 2018-2019 Deadline Extended

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library is offering Short-Term Travel Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives.

Special Collections at the Richard J. Daley Library houses manuscripts, rare books, photographs, and artifacts on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents the city’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. Premier collections include the papers of Richard J. Daley, the Chicago Urban League, the Century of Progress, exemplars of 21st century design, and the Chicago settlement house movement. More information is available at library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

An interdisciplinary committee will review the applications, and selections will be announced in early May 2018.  Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS EXTENDED: January 31, 2018

AWARD CYCLE:  The UIC academic year begins August 16 and ends August 15.  For this awards cycle, projects may begin any time after acceptance in May 2018 and end by August 15, 2019.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to individual researchers, teachers, and writers of any nationality, in any academic discipline. Preference is given to applicants who plan to use UIC political manuscript collections. Applicants must live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area and more than 100 miles from the UIC campus. Past UIC Special Collections fellows are eligible.

AWARD: $4,000, paid in one installment when the Fellow’s travel itinerary is finalized.

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report. Fellows may be invited to give a presentation on their research.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter that includes a title and description of your research project and preferred dates of the Fellowship, June 2018 – August 15, 2019.
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words): Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use in the UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.
  3. Proposed outcome of research, such as a paper, chapter, course, etc. (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project.
  4. Curriculum vitae.
  5. Letter of recommendation evaluating your proposed project. (The letter may be sent separately, but in your application please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person who will be writing the recommendation.)

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources
The University of Illinois at Chicago
uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

For questions, please contact lib-fellowships@uic.edu.

The UIC Library Special Collections Short-Term Travel Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Application Information PDF

Remembering Richard J. Daley on the anniversary of his death

Today marks the 41st anniversary of Mayor Daley’s death.

“When the mayor died, it was like the end of the world. It was like having your own father die.” – Ray Simon, Corporation Counsel City of Chicago 1965-1969, interview excerpt, June 30, 2010

Learn more about Richard J. Daley’s legacy and the UIC Library’s Richard J. Daley Collection

 

Mayor Richard J. Daley at his desk, about to give a speech in front of television cameras, ca. 1956.

Mayor Richard J. Daley at his desk, about to give a speech in front of television cameras, ca. 1956.

Merry Christmas!

Richard J. Daley, dressed as Santa, poses with son John Daley's first grade class.

Richard J. Daley, dressed as Santa, is seated behind a group of school children in his son John Daley’s first grade classroom at Nativity of Our Lord School, 1952. John Daley is seated on his father’s lap. Michael Daley stands directly to the left.

Illinois State Rep. Richard J. Daley

On Nov. 3, 1936, Richard J. Daley was elected to his first political office as a write-in Republican candidate to replace the recently deceased Rep. David Shanahan in the Illinois General Assembly. Immediately after the election, however, Daley returned to the Democratic Party. He remained a lifelong Democrat. In the legislature, Daley supported progressive legislation such as the school lunch program and a fairer state sales tax.

Learn more

Richard J. Daley with a group of Illinois legislators during his first term in office, ca. 1936.

Richard J. Daley with a group of Illinois legislators during his first term in office, ca. 1936.

 

 

Happy Halloween!

The Daley family at Halloween

The Daley family at Halloween, October 30, 1951. RJD_04_01_0003_0008_010

Seventy years ago today

On this day in 1947 Richard J. Daley replaced Hugh Connelly as ward committeeman for Chicago’s 11th Ward.

 

Richard J. Daley with Hugh "Babe" Connelly, Alderman Stanley J. Nowakowski, Russell O'Brien, Judge Wosik, William Lynch, and others from the 11th Ward, ca. 1940s.

Richard J. Daley with Hugh “Babe” Connelly, Alderman Stanley J. Nowakowski, Russell O’Brien, Judge Wosik, William Lynch, and others from the 11th Ward, ca. 1940s.