News and Research Funds

Baseball season in Chicago! Two teams, one mayor

Mayor Richard J. Daley prepares to throw out a baseball to start a game, as two baseball players, one in a Sox uniform and the other in a Chicago Cubs uniform, look on, circa 1950s

Mayor Richard J. Daley prepares to throw out a baseball to start a game, as two baseball players, one in a Sox uniform and the other in a Chicago Cubs uniform, look on, circa 1950s. RJD_04_01_0042_0001_103

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley visits Europe (1964)

Leaving for Europe

Fifty-five years ago this month, in May 1964, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and his wife, Eleanor “Sis” Daley, visited Europe. They accompanied other American politicians on parts of this visit, including Wisconsin Governor John Reynolds and Minnesota Governor Karl H. Rolvaag. They left for Copenhagen, Denmark on the inaugural Scandinavian Airlines direct flight from Chicago, arriving May 1.

Inaugural SAS flight to Copenhagen and Ireland, Eleanor and Richard J. Daley and others, 1964

Inaugural SAS flight to Copenhagen and Ireland, Eleanor and Richard J. Daley and others, 1964. Metro News Photo, RJD_04_01_0023_0005_001

Itineraries

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 1., 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 1., 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_003

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 2, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 2, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_004

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 3, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 3, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_005

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 4, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 4, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_006

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 5, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 5, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_007

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 6, 1964

Itinerary for Europe trip, page 6, 1964. RJD_01_01_0049_0002_006

The grand tour (selected images)

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with Pope Paul VI, 1964

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with Pope Paul VI, 1964. Pontificia Fotografia Felici, photographer. RJD_04_01_0049_0001_007

Eleanor "Sis" Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley visit the grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France, 1964

Eleanor “Sis” Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley visit the grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0005_016

Eleanor Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley meet the Lord Mayor of London, Alderman Clement Harman at Mansion House, 1964

Eleanor Daley and Mayor Richard J. Daley meet the Lord Mayor of London, Alderman Clement Harman at Mansion House, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0005_020

 

Last stop: “Ireland, of course”

Chicago’s director of special events, Colonel “Jack” Reilly, accompanied Mayor and Mrs. Daley on the trip to Europe. When a reporter for the Chicago Tribune asked where the the Mayor’s last stop would be, Reilly answered, “Heaven.” He clarified: “Ireland, of course.”

Colonel Jack Reilly (left foreground) and others at a candlelight event during a trip to Ireland, 1964

Colonel Jack Reilly (left foreground) and others at a candlelight event during a trip to Ireland, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0012_003

Irish dignitaries

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley with Mayor of Dungarvan, Ireland, Andy Minihan, 1964

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley with Mayor of Dungarvan, Ireland, Andy Minihan, 1964. Colm O’Byrne, photographer. RJD_04_01_0023_0012_008

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley outside with Irish President Eamon de Valera at his home, 1964

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley outside with Irish President Eamon de Valera at his home, 1964. RJD_04_01_0023_0011_004

Relatives of late United States President John F. Kennedy

Trip to Ireland, Richard J. and Eleanor Daley with relatives of John F. Kennedy and others, 1964

Trip to Ireland, Richard J. and Eleanor Daley with relatives of John F. Kennedy and others, 1964. Colm O’Byrne, photographer. RJD_04_01_0023_0012_014

County Waterford

Mayor Daley’s paternal and maternal ancestors had hailed from County Waterford. In the section of Waterford called Old Parish, Mayor and Mrs. Daley received a warm welcome.

Mayor Richard J. Daley speaks at an Old Parish event to commemorate him during his visit to Ireland. Eleanor "Sis" Daley is among those seated on the dais, 1964

Mayor Richard J. Daley speaks at an Old Parish event to commemorate him during his visit to Ireland. Eleanor “Sis” Daley is among those seated on the dais, 1964. RJD_04_01_0042_0001_034

Local officials unveiled this plaque:

This plantation containing ten acres was financed by the contributions of some friends and associates of Richard J. Daley Mayor of Chicago, to whose honour it is dedicated. A.D. 1959

Unveiling of the Daley family homestead monument at Monameean during Daley's trip to Ireland, 1964

Unveiling of the Daley family homestead monument at Monameean during Daley’s trip to Ireland, 1964. R. Wiley, photographer. RJD_04_01_0023_0013_018

More photographs

See more images from Mayor Richard J. Daley’s 1964 trip to Europe

These photographs come from the Richard J. Daley Collection, housed in the Special Collections and University Archives of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library. Most of the photographs in this collection have been digitized and are available online in the Richard J. Daley Era Photograph Collection. For questions about the photographs or about making an appointment to visit UIC Special Collections, feel free to Ask a Librarian.

Sources consulted

“Newspaper Clippings–Trip to Ireland, 1964,” box SVB17, folder 4. Richard J. Daley Collection, University of Illinois at Chicago Library.

Doyle, James. “5,000 Cheer Daleys in Ancestral Home,” Chicago Tribune, May 19, 1964, p. 9.

Morgan, Gwen. “Daley Pleads for Home Rule from London!” Chicago Tribune, May 16, 1964, p. 2.

Richard J. Daley collection, University of Illinois at Chicago Library.

Remembering 1989: Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first inauguration

Thirty years ago today, on April 24, 1989, Richard M. Daley was sworn in as Chicago’s mayor for the first of what would be six terms in office. This photograph comes from the Richard M. Daley papers, the processed portions of which are open to researchers. Please see the Daley Family research guide for more information.

Scene from Mayor Richard M. Daley's first inauguration, with a copy of the inaugural program

Scene from Mayor Richard M. Daley’s first inauguration, with a copy of the inaugural program. RMD_01_313_0007_001

Sixty years since Richard J. Daley’s first re-election as mayor

Today marks Mayor Richard J. Daley’s first re-election as mayor on April 7, 1959.

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley stands next to stack of petitions to place his name for re-election, 1959.

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley stands next to stack of petitions to place his name for re-election, 1959. RJD_04_01_0015_0003_013

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley jokes with a supporter during a re-election campaign, 1959

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley jokes with a supporter during a re-election campaign, 1959. RJD_04_01_0015_0003_003

Daley’s victory was huge. He garnered more than 777,000 votes while his Republican opponent, Tim Sheehan, polled only around 312,000.

Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor "Sis" Daley greet well-wishers at the mayor's inauguration for his second term, 1959

Mayor Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley greet well-wishers at the mayor’s inauguration for his second term, 1959. RJD_04_01_0015_0005_006

Work consulted

Tagge, George. “Daley Elected by 465,000,” Chicago Tribune, April 8, 1959, p. 1.

Remembering 1989: Richard M. Daley elected mayor of Chicago

On this date in 1989, Richard M. Daley won election as Chicago’s 54th mayor. He went on to serve a total of six terms, stepping down in 2011.

Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Mayor Richard M. Daley. RMD_07_0057_0002_003.

This photograph comes from the Richard M. Daley Papers, the processed portions of which are open to the public. For more information on doing research in the Richard M. Daley Papers, the Richard J. Daley Collection, and related collections, please see our research guide for the Daley Family Collections.

Happy election day!

Richard J. Daley stands in front of a voting booth on election day, flanked by his father Michael J. Daley and wife Eleanor "Sis" Daley, 1955

Richard J. Daley stands in front of a voting booth on election day, flanked by his father Michael J. Daley and wife Eleanor “Sis” Daley, 1955. RJD_04_01_0012_0002_018

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Valentine's Day event at City Hall with Mayor Richard J. Daley.

Valentine’s Day event at City Hall. Photo Laszlo Kondor. MSLASZ13_0002_0015_019

A stroll on a cold day

Col. Jack Riley, Illinois governor Dan Walker, Mayor Richard J. Daley, Senator Charles Percy, and others walking outside in winter.

Col. Jack Riley, Illinois governor Dan Walker, Mayor Richard J. Daley, Senator Charles Percy, and others walking outside in winter. Photo: Laszlo Kondor. MSLASZ13_0003_0003_001

Featuring: the Martin H. Kennelly Papers

UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds the papers of Martin H. Kennelly, who served as Chicago’s mayor from 1947 to 1955. During his time in office, Kennelly gained a reputation for honesty and for running a businesslike administration.

Portrait of Mayor Martin Kennelly

Martin Kennelly, ca. 1950s. RJD_04_01_0009_0007_014

Kennelly maintained ties with his fellow Democrats nationally and locally.

Mayor Martin Kennelly speaks at a Truman campaign event, ca. 1948

Mayor Martin Kennelly speaks at a Truman campaign event, ca. 1948. RJD_04_01_0001_0012_005

11th Ward Picnic, Richard J. Daley and Martin Kennelly, August 21, 1949

11th Ward Picnic, Richard J. Daley and Martin Kennelly, August 21, 1949. RJD_04_01_0002_0010_007

Mayor Martin Kennelly, Richard J. Daley, and John Mortimer display newspapers after the mayor's re-election

Mayor Martin Kennelly, Richard J. Daley, and John Mortimer display newspapers after the mayor’s re-election, 1951. RJD_04_01_0010_0002_009

In 1955, Richard J. Daley, who was Cook County Clerk at the time, ran against Kennelly for the Democratic Party’s nomination for mayor. Kennelly lost, and Daley went on to win the mayor’s race that year.

In his inaugural address, Daley thanked the outgoing mayor:

I want to express the appreciation and admiration which I know all the people of Chicago have for the administration of Martin Kennelly. He will always be remembered as a mayor who made important contributions to his city.

The Martin H. Kennelly Papers holds more than 130 linear feet of materials and consists primarily of speeches, correspondence, and newspaper clippings from Kennelly’s three mayoral campaigns and his eight years in office. The collection is open to the public and researchers may access them by visiting UIC Special Collections and University Archives in the Richard J. Daley Library.

Sources consulted

Daley, Richard J. “Inaugural Address of Richard J. Daley, Mayor.” Richard J. Daley Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. Series 1, subseries 1, box 21, folder 4.

Martin H. Kennelly Papers, finding aid. <https://findingaids.library.uic.edu/sc/MSKenn77.xml>. Accessed January 17, 2019.

Richard J. Daley Era Photographs (University of Illinois at Chicago). CARLI digital collections. <http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/uic_rjdaley>. Accessed January 17, 2019.

No place like home

Eighty years ago, Richard J. Daley and Eleanor “Sis” Daley moved into their home in Bridgeport, the Chicago neighborhood where they had both grown up. The Daleys purchased two lots of land and had the house built quickly. “On August 15 we broke ground. We moved in on November 15,” Eleanor recalled in an oral history interview she gave on July 18, 2002 [PDF].

Image of the Daley family home in Bridgeport

The Daley family home in Bridgeport. Photo: László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0002_0003_002

Mayor Richard J. and Eleanor "Sis" Daley outside their home on St. Patrick's Day, circa 1972-1976.

Mayor Richard J. and Eleanor “Sis” Daley outside their home on St. Patrick’s Day, circa 1972-1976. Photo László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0004_0011_024

Source

Interview with Eleanor “Sis” Daley, July 18, 2002 [PDF]. Richard J. Daley Oral History Collection, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Featuring: the Edmund Kasper Jarecki Papers at UIC

Edmund Kasper Jarecki (1879-1966) served Chicago in a number of capacities. In 1908 he represented what was then the city’s 16th Ward. From 1914 to 1920, he served as judge of the municipal court. In 1922 he won election to the Cook County court, where he stayed for more than 30 years and earned a reputation as a champion for honesty in city elections.

Cook County Clerk Richard J. Daley administers the oath of office to Judge Edmund Kasper Jarecki in 1954.

Cook County Clerk Richard J. Daley administers the oath of office to Judge Edmund Kasper Jarecki. RJD_04_01_0008_0004_020.

Upon Jarecki’s retirement in 1954, the Cook County Democratic Party noted his “outstanding ability, unimpeachable integrity and unquestioned honesty” in a resolution commending him for his years of service.

The University of Illinois at Chicago houses Judge Jarecki’s papers. The materials in this collection document the judge’s many years of service as well as aspects of his personal life. See the finding aid (inventory list) for the Edmund Kasper Jarecki Papers for more information.

Note: Quotation comes from the Richard J. Daley Collection, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago. Box SIss1B18, folder 1.

Thanksgiving!

Card says "Happy Thanksgiving"
A Thanksgiving Day card from friends to the Daley family. From the Richard J. Daley Collection, RJD_04_01_0028_0012_002c.

Before he was mayor

Eighty years ago today, Richard J. Daley won election to the Illinois State Senate after serving one term in the state’s house of representatives. In the image below, Daley stands to the right with his fellow senators.

Richard J. Daley's first session in the Illinois Senate.

Richard J. Daley’s first session in the Illinois Senate. Daley is standing on the right. RJD_04_01_0001_0003_003

For more images from the Richard J. Daley Collection, see the Richard J. Daley Era Photographs.

Time to vote!

Eleanor "Sis" Daley speaks with Richard J. Daley at a voting booth.

Primary election day, Richard J. and Eleanor “Sis” Daley at a voting booth

UIC Special Collections and University Archives at the Daley Library closed to researchers through January 13, 2019

UIC Special Collections and University Archives in the Richard J. Daley Library is closed for equipment and storage upgrades from Thursday, October 18, 2018 to January 13, 2019. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your patience.

Limited online reference service will still be available, but we may not be able to honor requests for photocopies, scans, or digital reproductions.

Researchers are also welcome to use our many online resources by visiting the UIC Image Collections.

UIC students share what they learned using the Richard J. Daley Collection

UIC students from the "City at a Crossroads" seminar with Lecturer David Greenstein.

UIC students from the “City at a Crossroads” seminar with Lecturer David Greenstein.

In this video clip, UIC Honors College students from the University Library’s seminar entitled “City at a Crossroads: Local, National and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968” share what they learned using the Richard J. Daley Collection. Taught by Lecturer David Greenstein, the class gives students the opportunity to ask and answer their own questions about local/national/global connections, race and urban space, social movements and political campaigns. Classes take place in the Special Collections department, allowing students the opportunity to discover and analyze primary documents in a collaborative setting. Assignments and activities introduce students to working with archival records, interpreting primary documents, developing research questions that can be addressed with available materials and explaining the results of their research. In addition to discussing issues that still face Chicago and the nation, students gain skills in critical thinking, interpreting evidence and producing effective arguments.

Watch student interviews

Queen Elizabeth II visits Chicago 59 years ago today

On July 6, 1959, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom visited Chicago to commemorate the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway, which facilitated international, waterborne trade via the Saint Lawrence River and the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada.

Map of docking area for Queen Elizabeth II's arrival in Chicago

Map of docking area for Queen Elizabeth II’s arrival in Chicago, 1959. RJD_01_02_0003_0010_008

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley welcomed the Queen. See a brief film of her arrival below.

During her stay, the Queen and Prince Philip visited the Chicago International Trade Fair.

Richard J. Daley, Queen Elizabeth II, and Prince Phillip tour the International Trade Fair

Richard J. Daley, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, and others tour the International Trade Fair in Chicago, 1959. Photo: Pics Chicago. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_006

One highlight of the Queen’s stay was the banquet that Chicago and Mayor Daley held in her honor.

Mayor Daley and Queen Elizabeth II walk to banquet in the Queen's honor,

Mayor Daley and Queen Elizabeth II walk to banquet in the Queen’s honor, 1959. Photo: R. E. Murphy. RJD_04_01_0045_0011_027

Banquet for Queen Elizabeth II at Conrad Hilton Hotel, 1959. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_011

Banquet for Queen Elizabeth II at Conrad Hilton Hotel, 1959. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_011

Announcing the 2018 Short-Term Travel and UIC Graduate Student Fellowship Recipients

In early May 2018, Short-Term Travel Fellowships were awarded to four individuals studying at universities across the United States. In addition, University of Illinois at Chicago Graduate Student Fellowships were awarded to two UIC scholars.

The Short-Term Travel Fellowship gives individual researchers, teachers and writers of any nationality who live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area the opportunity to travel to UIC to conduct research using special collections and university archives. The UIC Graduate Student Fellowship is open to UIC students who are enrolled in a graduate degree program and conducting research in subject areas related to the Library’s strong special collections in the history of Chicago.

For a complete list of the Library’s holdings, visit library.uic.edu/special-collections-university-archives.

Congratulations to the 2018 fellows!

UIC Library Short-Term Travel Fellowship awardees

Amy Zenoni, Ph.D. candidate, History
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
Poor Health: Retrenchment and Resistance in Chicago’s Public Hospital

Melanie Newport, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of U.S. History, Affiliated Faculty in American Studies, Urban and Community Studies
University of Connecticut-Hartford
Community of the Condemned

Eric Fure-Slocum, Ph.D, Associate Professor of History
St. Olaf College
Losing Hope: Workers’ Disengagement in Metropolitan America

Amani Morrison, Ph.D. candidate, African American and African Diaspora Studies
University of California-Berkeley
Kitchenette Building: A Cultural History

UIC Library Graduate Student Fellowship awardees

Maureen Heffern Ponicki, Ph.D. candidate, Political Science
Deindustrialization in America’s Rust Belt: Urban Governance that Builds Inclusive Resiliency

Sara O’Neill Kohl, Ph.D. candidate, Urban Planning and Policy
What Happened to Fighting Back? The Rise and Fall of Industrial Policy and the Making of Economic Development

Interested in applying?
Details will be forthcoming about the next application cycle for UIC Library Fellowships program on library.uic.edu.

Thank you!
The UIC Library’s Graduate Student and Short-Term Travel Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Happy Birthday, Richard J. Daley

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

UIC Richard J. Daley Special Collections Research Award

Each year, the UIC University Library offers local area high school students the University of Illinois at Chicago Richard J. Daley Special Collections Research Award as part of the Chicago Metro History Fair. The award is generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee. A $300 prize is given to the high school student who best uses the Library’s Special Collections and University Archives resources, either at the Richard J. Daley Library or the Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago. This year’s topic for the History Fair was Conflict and Compromise in History.

Congratulations to the 2017-2018 winner!
Leslye Calvillo

Prosser Career Academy
The Jane Collective: How Jane Illegally Provided Safe Abortions

Students work on projects throughout the academic year and the winners are recognized each spring.

Learn more about the Chicago Metro History Fair

UIC receives papers of longest-serving Chicago mayor, Richard M. Daley

The University of Illinois at Chicago is proud to announce that former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley has chosen to make UIC’s Richard J. Daley Library the repository for a large collection of papers and artifacts amassed during his 22-year mayoral tenure.

Daley’s donated papers are now available to researchers and students in the Special Collections and University Archives of his father’s namesake library. A ceremony held Tuesday at UIC honored the donation, the anniversary of his first inauguration as mayor on April 24, 1989, and celebrated his 76th birthday.

“This donation by the Hon. Richard M. Daley reinforces the Daley family’s commitment to UIC. The papers of Richard M. Daley are important source materials documenting the evolution of Chicago as a global urban center,” UIC Chancellor Michael Amiridis said.

“The documents are also important primary sources that will serve to provide integral educational opportunities to students and researchers who may want to study the history of Chicago. We are honored that the Daley family has continued to entrust UIC to be the caretakers of their archives telling the story of one of the most important families of our city.”

Read the full release
View the finding aid

 

Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley in front of a desk that he and his father used in City Hall. The desk is part of the collection donated to UIC. (Photo: Jenny Fontaine)

Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley in front of a desk that he and his father used in City Hall. The desk is part of the collection donated to UIC. (Photo: Jenny Fontaine)

William and John Daley visit City at a Crossroads class

In April 2018, former White House Chief of Staff William M. Daley and Cook County Board Commissioner John P. Daley spoke to students of the City at a Crossroads: Local, National and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968 Honors College seminar about the tumultuous political and social climate in Chicago during the 60s and 70s. The Daleys shared their personal experiences of the key events of the time as well as insights about their father, the late Mayor Richard J. Daley. The students had an opportunity to discuss with the Daleys how the societal issues of the past compare to today’s. Classes are held in the Special Collections Reading Room of the library so students can examine primary documents from the Richard J. Daley Collection to conduct research. Taught by Visiting Lecturer David Greenstein, the class gives students the opportunity to ask and answer their own questions about local/national/global connections, race, urban space, social movements and political campaigns.

William M. Daley speaks to students of City at a Crossroads: Local, National, and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968 about his experiences in Chicago during the late 1960s.

William M. Daley speaks to students of City at a Crossroads: Local, National, and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968 about his experiences in Chicago during the late 1960s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John P. Daley with students of the City at a Crossroads seminar.

John P. Daley with students of the City at a Crossroads seminar.

UIC Library’s mosaic portrait of Richard J. Daley on display at the National Museum of Mexican Art

In 1964, architect, artist and designer Genaro Álvarez created an amethyst stone mosaic portrait of Mayor Richard J. Daley with the city’s “I Will” spirit arising from the Great Chicago Fire in the background. This tribute portrait was displayed for about one month at the Mexican Tourist Bureau, in City Hall and finally at the Chicago Press Club library with other works by Álvarez before it was donated to the UIC Richard J. Daley Library.

Álvarez regularly integrated protruding precious stones into his mosaic murals and Venetian style portraits of historic leaders. He named this practice “coarse topography.”

The “I Will” mural is on display at the National Museum of Mexican Art through August 2018 as part of the exhibition, Arte Diseño Xicágo: Mexican Inspiration from the World’s Columbian Exposition to the Civil Rights Era, as well as the Art Design Chicago citywide celebration of Chicago’s art and design history.

Learn more

 

"I Will" mosaic of Richard J. Daley by artist Genaro Álvarez.

“I Will” mosaic of Richard J. Daley by artist Genaro Álvarez.

UIC Library Special Collections Graduate Student Fellowships 2018-2019 Deadline Extended

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library is offering Graduate Student Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives.

Special Collections at the Richard J. Daley Library houses manuscripts, rare books, photographs, and artifacts on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents the city’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. Premier collections include the papers of Richard J. Daley, the Chicago Urban League, the Century of Progress, exemplars of 21st century design, and the Chicago settlement house movement. More information is available at library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

An interdisciplinary committee will review the applications, and selections will be announced in early May 2018.  Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS EXTENDED: January 31, 2018

AWARD CYCLE:  The UIC academic year begins August 16 and ends August 15.  For this awards cycle, projects may begin any time after acceptance in May 2018 and end by August 15, 2019.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to graduate students enrolled in graduate degree programs at UIC. All academic disciplines are eligible. Preference is given to applicants who plan to use UIC political manuscript collections. Past UIC Special Collections fellows are eligible.

AWARD: $2,000 for one semester during the 2017/18 or 2018/19 academic years. The Fellowship does not include a tuition waiver. The stipend will be paid in one installment one at the beginning of the fellowship semester.

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report. Fellows may be invited to give a presentation on their research.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter that includes a title and description of your research project and preferred semester of the fellowship.
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words): Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use in the UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.
  3. Proposed outcome of research such as a paper, thesis, etc. (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project.
  4. Curriculum vitae.
  5. Letter of recommendation from your advisor evaluating your proposed project.  The letter may be sent separately, but in your application please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person who will be writing the recommendation.

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources
The University of Illinois at Chicago
uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

For questions, please contact lib-fellowships@uic.edu.

The UIC Library Special Collections Graduate Student Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Application Information PDF

UIC Library Special Collections Short-Term Travel Fellowships 2018-2019 Deadline Extended

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library is offering Short-Term Travel Fellowships to further research using the holdings of Special Collections and University Archives.

Special Collections at the Richard J. Daley Library houses manuscripts, rare books, photographs, and artifacts on the social, political, and cultural history of Chicago. The Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago Special Collections documents the city’s rich history as a center for the education and practice of the medical arts. Premier collections include the papers of Richard J. Daley, the Chicago Urban League, the Century of Progress, exemplars of 21st century design, and the Chicago settlement house movement. More information is available at library.uic.edu/home/collections/special-collections-university-archives.

An interdisciplinary committee will review the applications, and selections will be announced in early May 2018.  Up to three Fellowships will be awarded.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS EXTENDED: January 31, 2018

AWARD CYCLE:  The UIC academic year begins August 16 and ends August 15.  For this awards cycle, projects may begin any time after acceptance in May 2018 and end by August 15, 2019.

ELIGIBILITY: The award is open to individual researchers, teachers, and writers of any nationality, in any academic discipline. Preference is given to applicants who plan to use UIC political manuscript collections. Applicants must live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area and more than 100 miles from the UIC campus. Past UIC Special Collections fellows are eligible.

AWARD: $4,000, paid in one installment when the Fellow’s travel itinerary is finalized.

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: Fellows are required to submit a midterm report and final report. Fellows may be invited to give a presentation on their research.

APPLICATIONS: A completed application consists of the following components:

  1. A cover letter that includes a title and description of your research project and preferred dates of the Fellowship, June 2018 – August 15, 2019.
  2. Statement of purpose (300-500 words): Explain the nature of your project and the sources you expect to use in the UIC Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.
  3. Proposed outcome of research, such as a paper, chapter, course, etc. (100 to 200 words): Briefly explain how this fellowship will aid in the completion of your project.
  4. Curriculum vitae.
  5. Letter of recommendation evaluating your proposed project. (The letter may be sent separately, but in your application please include the name, email address, and affiliation of the person who will be writing the recommendation.)

Electronic submissions only:

Library Human Resources
The University of Illinois at Chicago
uic.libraryjobs@gmail.com

For questions, please contact lib-fellowships@uic.edu.

The UIC Library Special Collections Short-Term Travel Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Application Information PDF

Remembering Richard J. Daley on the anniversary of his death

Today marks the 41st anniversary of Mayor Daley’s death.

“When the mayor died, it was like the end of the world. It was like having your own father die.” – Ray Simon, Corporation Counsel City of Chicago 1965-1969, interview excerpt, June 30, 2010

Learn more about Richard J. Daley’s legacy and the UIC Library’s Richard J. Daley Collection

 

Mayor Richard J. Daley at his desk, about to give a speech in front of television cameras, ca. 1956.

Mayor Richard J. Daley at his desk, about to give a speech in front of television cameras, ca. 1956.

Merry Christmas!

Richard J. Daley, dressed as Santa, poses with son John Daley's first grade class.

Richard J. Daley, dressed as Santa, is seated behind a group of school children in his son John Daley’s first grade classroom at Nativity of Our Lord School, 1952. John Daley is seated on his father’s lap. Michael Daley stands directly to the left.

Illinois State Rep. Richard J. Daley

On Nov. 3, 1936, Richard J. Daley was elected to his first political office as a write-in Republican candidate to replace the recently deceased Rep. David Shanahan in the Illinois General Assembly. Immediately after the election, however, Daley returned to the Democratic Party. He remained a lifelong Democrat. In the legislature, Daley supported progressive legislation such as the school lunch program and a fairer state sales tax.

Learn more

Richard J. Daley with a group of Illinois legislators during his first term in office, ca. 1936.

Richard J. Daley with a group of Illinois legislators during his first term in office, ca. 1936.

 

 

Happy Halloween!

The Daley family at Halloween

The Daley family at Halloween, October 30, 1951. RJD_04_01_0003_0008_010

Seventy years ago today

On this day in 1947 Richard J. Daley replaced Hugh Connelly as ward committeeman for Chicago’s 11th Ward.

 

Richard J. Daley with Hugh "Babe" Connelly, Alderman Stanley J. Nowakowski, Russell O'Brien, Judge Wosik, William Lynch, and others from the 11th Ward, ca. 1940s.

Richard J. Daley with Hugh “Babe” Connelly, Alderman Stanley J. Nowakowski, Russell O’Brien, Judge Wosik, William Lynch, and others from the 11th Ward, ca. 1940s.

City that works

As mayor, Richard J. Daley focused on municipal services and the development of the city center, contributing to the oft-cited image of Chicago as “the city that works.” During his first term, the city added new garbage trucks, sewers, street and alley lighting, downtown parking facilities and more police and fire personnel. Under his watch, the Central District Filtration Plant (1968), the largest in the world, provided fluoridated water to the central and north sides and the South Water Filtration Plant was expanded. In 1975, the Deep Tunnel project (Tunnel and Reservoir Plan) was begun to relieve flooding in the metropolitan area. The city’s first bicycle paths and first city-sponsored neighborhood health clinics were initiated and neighborhood cleanup campaigns were begun.

Learn more

 

Richard J. Daley attending police roll call at city hall, ca.1950s.Copelin Commercial Photographers RJD_04_01_0004_0004_005

Richard J. Daley attending police roll call at city hall, ca.1950s. Copelin Commercial Photographers RJD_04_01_0004_0004_005

Dr. Paul Dudley White and Richard J. Daley (right) riding a tandem bike to help open a bicycle path on Ogden Avenue, 1956. RJD_04_01_0004_0004_013

Dr. Paul Dudley White and Richard J. Daley (right) riding a tandem bike to help open a bicycle path on Ogden Avenue, 1956. RJD_04_01_0004_0004_013

Jack Brickhouse of WGN interviewing Mayor Richard J. Daley about a Cleanup Parade on State Street, April 12, 1958. RJD_04_01_0019_0012_006

Jack Brickhouse of WGN interviewing Mayor Richard J. Daley about a Cleanup Parade on State Street, April 12, 1958. RJD_04_01_0019_0012_006

 11th Ward Cleanup Parade Float, undated. RJD_04_01_0038_0020_006

11th Ward Cleanup Parade Float, undated. RJD_04_01_0038_0020_006

Golden anniversary

Fifty years ago today, on August 15, 1967, the City of Chicago officially unveiled what has become known as “The Picasso,” a fifty-foot tall sculpture designed by the celebrated Spanish artist, Pablo Picasso.

Scene from the dedication of the Picasso sculpture

Scene from the dedication of the Picasso sculpture, August 1967. RJD_04_01_0026_0007_006

Mayor Richard J. Daley thought it represented “the profile of a woman.”

Others may have disagreed. But as the City of Chicago pointed out on its online post, “Everyone’s Picasso,” the sculpture has become

an enduring influence on Chicago’s public art. It has been featured in popular films like The Blues Brothers, The Fugitive, and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. Now a beloved symbol of Chicago, the Picasso is central to hundreds of events in Daley Plaza, including creative arts performances and farmers markets.

City of Chicago. Everyone’s Chicago: Celebrating the 50th anniversary of a Chicago icon, undated  <https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dca/supp_info/yopa0.html>. Accessed August 11, 2017.

Richard J. Daley, director of budgets

Before Richard J. Daley became Mayor of Chicago, he served the public in several other positions. During Adlai E. Stevenson II’s first two years as Illinois governor, from 1949 to 1950, Daley served as the budget director.

Governor Adlai E. Stevenson's cabinet, with Richard J. Daley seated at the far right

Governor Adlai E. Stevenson’s cabinet, with Richard J. Daley seated at the far right

Daley left his position as state revenue director to fill a vacancy for the position of Cook County Clerk.

Richard J. Daley with his wife Eleanor Daley and their seven children, and his father (Michael J. Daley) at his induction ceremony as County Clerk. Father Murray, an unidentified man, Martin Kennelly, and Abraham Lincoln Marovitz are also pictured

Richard J. Daley with his wife Eleanor Daley and their seven children, and his father (Michael J. Daley) at his induction ceremony as County Clerk. Father Murray, an unidentified man, Martin Kennelly, and Abraham Lincoln Marovitz are also pictured

According to an oral history interview given by Ed Bedore [PDF], a former budget director for the city of Chicago, this prior experience helped prepare Daley manage the city’s budgets.

Mayor Daley knew more about the budget than any of us did in the budget office. The mayor was the former Director of Revenue for the State of Illinois. He was the Cook County Clerk who, at the time, did the county budget. So he was in charge of the county budget and the Department of Revenue. So when he became the mayor, he knew about the budget just as well as anybody. And he was also, I’ll word it very carefully, he was very frugal with the city money. He kept his salary at thirty-five thousand dollars, which allowed the department heads – every year we’d get a small increase. But because we were pushing thirty five thousand . . . as long as he never had his salary increased, we could never go higher than his. But that was the mayor. He always looked out for the taxpayers.

Ed Bedore, City Budget Director interview excerpt, May 18, 2009

For more information about Daley’s efforts as mayor to manage Chicago’s finances, see the Budget, Banking and Business portion of the Remembering Richard J. Daley online exhibit.

Queen Elizabeth II visits Chicago

On July 6, 1959, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom visited Chicago to commemorate the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway, which facilitated international, waterborne trade via the Saint Lawrence River and the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada.

Map of docking area for Queen Elizabeth II's arrival in Chicago

Map of docking area for Queen Elizabeth II’s arrival in Chicago, 1959. RJD_01_02_0003_0010_008

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley welcomed the Queen. See a brief film of her arrival below.

During her stay, the Queen and Prince Philip visited the Chicago International Trade Fair.

Richard J. Daley, Queen Elizabeth II, and Prince Phillip tour the International Trade Fair

Richard J. Daley, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, and others tour the International Trade Fair in Chicago, 1959. Photo: Pics Chicago. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_006

One highlight of the Queen’s stay was the banquet that Chicago and Mayor Daley held in her honor.

Mayor Daley and Queen Elizabeth II walk to banquet in the Queen's honor,

Mayor Daley and Queen Elizabeth II walk to banquet in the Queen’s honor, 1959. Photo: R. E. Murphy. RJD_04_01_0045_0011_027

Banquet for Queen Elizabeth II at Conrad Hilton Hotel, 1959. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_011

Banquet for Queen Elizabeth II at Conrad Hilton Hotel, 1959. RJD_04_01_0046_0001_011

Forty years of service and family

On this date in 1936, Richard J. Daley married Eleanor “Sis” Guilfoyle. Later that year, Richard won his first elected position (as a representative in the Illinois General Assembly) and within 20 years, he became mayor of Chicago, serving until his death in 1976.

Over those 40 years, Richard and Eleanor stood by each other.

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley standing in front of their bungalow at 3536 S. Lowe.

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley standing in front of their bungalow at 3536 S. Lowe. RJD_04_01_0029_0011_003

They raised seven children.

The Daley family at Halloween

The Daley family at Halloween, October 30, 1951. RJD_04_01_0003_0008_010

County Clerk ceremony. Richard J. Daley with his wife Eleanor Daley, their seven children, and Daley's father (Michael Daley), 1955.

County Clerk ceremony. Richard J. Daley with his wife Eleanor Daley, their seven children, and Daley’s father (Michael Daley), 1955. RJD_04_01_0008_0002_007

They voted together.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley at their Bridgeport polling place, 1975.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley at their Bridgeport polling place, 1975. RJD_04_01_0035_0007_008

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley in voting booth

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley in voting booth, 1963. RJD_04_01_0022_0008_016

They traveled together.

Daley family arrival at Hilo, Hawaii airport for the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Daley family arrival at Hilo, Hawaii airport for the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Also included are Helene H. Hale, Hawaii County Chairman and Glenn Oda, Pres. of Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce, 1963. RJD_04_01_0048_0009_005

And together they participated in and contributed to Chicago’s cultural and political life.

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley standing with members of the Illinois Democratic Women’s Club

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley standing with members of the Illinois Democratic Women’s Club at their luncheon, ca. 1960s. RJD_04_01_0017_0001_013

Eleanor Daley, Richard J. Daley, William Daley, John Daley and others at Mayor Daley's celebration of 14 years in office as mayor, 1969. Photo: Mart Studios. RJD_04_01_0028_0010_001.

Eleanor Daley, Richard J. Daley, William Daley, John Daley and others at Mayor Daley’s celebration of 14 years in office as mayor, 1969. Photo: Mart Studios. RJD_04_01_0028_0010_001.

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with costumed Mrs. O'Leary and cow

Richard J. Daley and Eleanor Daley with costumed Mrs. O’Leary and cow, 1976. RJD_04_01_0036_0006_003

For more information, see the online list of interviews from the Richard J. Daley oral history Collection, where you can find accounts from friends, family members, and colleagues of the mayor. See also the finding aid (inventory listing) for the Richard J. Daley Collection at UIC Library. The collection is open to the public. If interested, feel free to Ask a Librarian to set up an appointment.

Featuring: For Chicago Records

UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds a small collection called the For Chicago Records. These materials document what turned out to be Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley’s last reelection campaign in 1975, and they offer a glimpse into the organizing style that proved so successful for the Mayor. Researchers are invited to check out the online finding aid (inventory listing) for the For Chicago Records as well as the list of finding aids for the other archival collections housed at UIC Library.

If you have questions or are interested in making and appointment, feel free to ask a librarian.

Regina Dominican High School student wins Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere History Award

Over the past decade, the University Library has partnered with the Chicago Metro History Fair to cultivate area students’ interest in the subject, teach critical thinking skills and illuminate the present by uncovering the past.

Emily McNaughton accepts the Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere History Award, presented by University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, Mary M. Case.

Emily McNaughton accepts the Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere History Award, presented by University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, Mary M. Case.

Each year, students from the Chicago area visit the Richard J. Daley Library for a “Research Palooza” event, during which they learn to efficiently and thoroughly search for information using the library’s online resources. They also receive valuable individualized coaching from librarians on their projects, including how to incorporate primary resources into their research.

The University Library sponsors one of the awards presented at the annual History Fair ceremony. This year, Emily McNaughton of the Regina Dominican High School earned the Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award (a monetary award of $300) for her project, “Mary Bartelme: The Woman Who Changed the Lives of Young Girls.” She completed her research on the first woman judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County assigned to the Juvenile Court in 1923 using UIC’s Midwest Women’s Historical Collection.

Congratulations to Emily McNaughton and all of the students who participated in this year’s Chicago Metro History Fair!

Thank you!

The Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award is generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Announcing the 2017 University Library Fellows

In May 2017 four Short-Term Travel Fellowships were awarded to individuals studying at universities in the United States, Canada and China. In addition, two University of Illinois at Chicago Graduate Student Fellowships were awarded to UIC scholars.

The Short-Term Fellowship gives individual researchers, teachers and writers of any nationality who live outside of the Chicago metropolitan area the opportunity to travel to UIC to conduct research. The UIC Graduate Student Fellowship is open to students who are enrolled in a graduate degree program in any discipline at UIC.

Congratulations to the 2017 fellows!

UIC Library short term fellowship awardees

Richard D. Benson II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Education Department
Spelman College
City of Wind, City of Fire: Education and Activism in Chicago 1966 – 1975

Maria Daxenbichler, Ph.D. candidate, Department of History
University of Buffalo
Women’s Movements for Reproductive Health in the Early Twentieth Century

Priscilla Roberts, Faculty of Business
City University of Macau
The Chicago Council on Foreign Relations and the Making of U.S. International Policies since 1922

Ian Rocksborough-Smith, Instructor, History
Corpus Christi and St. Marks College at the University of British Columbia
The Ambiguities of Catholic Inter-racialism in 1950s Chicago: Friendship House and the Catholic Interracial Council

UIC Library graduate student fellowship awardees

Meghan Daniel, Ph.D. student, Sociology
Margins to Center:  A Decade of Reproductive Justice Organizing

Marla McMackin, Ph.D. student, History
Migrant Daughters: Hull House and Gendered Social Services in Late Twentieth Century Chicago

Interested in applying?

The application cycle for the 2018 UIC Library Fellowship program begins in November 2017. Further details will be forthcoming on library.uic.edu.

Thank you!

The UIC Graduate Student and Short-Term Travel Fellowships are generously funded by the Richard J. Daley Collection Committee.

Day of remembrance

Two soldiers with a minister in Vietnam.

Two soldiers with a minister in Vietnam. RJD_04_01_0055_0001_006

Happy 115th Birthday!

Today marks the 115th anniversary of the birth of Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, who was born on May 15, 1902.

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

Richard J. Daley watched by his sons Michael, Richard, William, and John as he cuts his birthday cake (shaped like the Hancock building), undated. RJD_04_01_0029_0006_001

Revisiting the first inauguration, April 20, 1955

Sixty-two years ago today, Richard J. Daley was inaugurated for the first time as mayor of Chicago.

You can watch portions of Mayor Daley’s first inaugural address:

Video: Excerpt from “1955 Inauguration,” RJD_04_02_0000_0000_213

Fifty years ago today…

On April 4, 1967, Mayor Richard J. Daley won reelection to his fourth consecutive term in office. Daley beat his opponent, Republican John Warner, by a vote of 792,238 to 272,542.

Only two mayors in Chicago history have matched this feat. The first was Carter Henry Harrison, who won reelection to a fourth term in 1885. The second was Daley’s son, Richard M. Daley, who won his fourth term in 1999 and was reelected twice more, in 2003 and 2007.

Richard J. Daley on the telephone while seated at a desk

Richard J. Daley on the telephone while seated at a desk, undated. Photo: Illinois Bell Telephone Company. RJD_04_01_0040_0005_006

Source for facts: “Chicago Mayors, 1837-2007,” Encyclopedia of Chicago, <http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/1443.html>. Accessed March 28, 2017.

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

Richard J. Daley waving at St. Patrick's Day parade.

Richard J. Daley waving at St. Patrick’s Day parade. Photo: László Kondor. MSLASZ13_0004_0011_019

One step closer to the mayoralty

On this date in 1955, Richard J. Daley secured the Democratic nomination to run for mayor of Chicago. He had defeated Martin Kennelly, a Democrat who had been mayor of Chicago since 1947, by more than 100,000 votes. UIC Special Collections and University Archives holds the papers of both Richard J. Daley and Martin Kennelly. See the finding aids (inventory listings) for Kennelly and for Daley, and make an appointment to look at the collections in person in our reading room.

Richard J. Daley speaking on a stage in Bridgeport during his first mayoral campaign, 1955. RJD_04_01_0011_0001_022

Richard J. Daley speaking on a stage in Bridgeport during his first mayoral campaign, 1955. RJD_04_01_0011_0001_022

See also: “Kennelly beaten by 100,064 plurality,” Chicago Tribune, February 23, 1955, p. 1.

Presidents Day, Daley-style

Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley maintained a working relationship with each occupant of the White House. As head of one of the United States’ most important cities, he received visits from every president, Democrat or Republican.

Eleanor Daley presents Mamie Eisenhower with a bouquet of flowers at the airport.

Eleanor Daley presents Mamie Eisenhower with a bouquet of flowers at the airport. Also present are Richard J. Daley, Mrs. Stratton, Governor Stratton, President Dwight Eisenhower, and others. RJD_04_01_0045_0009_001

President Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard J. Daley at the airport

President Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard J. Daley at the airport, ca. 1960s. RJD_04_01_0046_0010_015

President Gerald Ford speaks with Richard J. Daley

President Gerald Ford speaks with Richard J. Daley, 1974. RJD_04_01_0053_0002_001

When Daley visited Washington D.C., the president often sought his advice on important matters, especially those that concerned urban affairs.

Richard J. Daley meets with President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Richard J. Daley meets with President Lyndon Baines Johnson, ca. 1963-1969. RJD_04_01_0072_0001_003

Mayor Richard J. Daley was the only Democrat invited to this meeting of Nixon cabinet members at the White House

Mayor Richard J. Daley was the only Democrat invited to this meeting of Nixon cabinet members at the White House, 1969. Photo: Official Photograph White House. RJD_04_01_0052_0007_001

In addition to serving as Chicago’s mayor, Daley chaired the Cook County Democratic Party. This influential post gave Daley a significant say in the operations of the party at the national level. Former and current Democratic presidents maintained friendships with their fellow party member.

Former President Harry Truman shaking hands with Richard J. Daley

Former President Harry Truman shaking hands with Richard J. Daley. Truman inscribed this photo, “A most pleasant meeting with a great mayor.” RJD_04_01_0044_0007_001

President John F. Kennedy and Richard J. Daley walk outside on the street in Chicago

President John F. Kennedy and Richard J. Daley walk outside on the street in Chicago, undated. RJD_04_01_0046_0012_019

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley, Col. Jack Riley, Lady Bird Johnson, and President Lyndon B. Johnson in Chinatown, May 17, 1966. RJD_04_01_0073_0001_009

Richard J. and Eleanor Daley, Col. Jack Riley, Lady Bird Johnson, and President Lyndon B. Johnson in Chinatown, May 17, 1966. RJD_04_01_0073_0001_009

Those Democrats who aspired to be president also visited Daley, seeking his support for their nomination and eager to work with him during the general election.

Richard J. Daley at podium in Sherman House Hotel with Edward Kennedy(left) and Senator George McGovern

Richard J. Daley at podium in Sherman House Hotel with Edward Kennedy (left) and Senator George McGovern (right), ca. 1972. RJD_04_01_0052_0012_005

Jimmy Carter and Richard J. Daley wave to the crowd in a parade car

Jimmy Carter and Richard J. Daley waving to the crowd from an open car at a Carter campaign event, 1976. RJD_04_01_0053_0011_010

UIC classes explore Daley legacy 40 years after death

[originally written by Carlos Sadovi, of the UIC News Center, on January 10, 2017. See the original article, “UIC classes explore Daley legacy 40 years after death.”]

Richard J. Daley standing in front of lakefront skyline, ca. 1972-1976. Photo: László Kondor. RJD_04_01_0041_0003_007

Richard J. Daley standing in front of lakefront skyline, ca. 1972-1976. Photo: László Kondor. RJD_04_01_0041_0003_007

When Richard J. Daley died Dec. 20, 1976, Chicago was not the same city that it was when he became mayor 21 years earlier. By the time he died, the tallest skyscrapers in the world were in Chicago, and the city was a required stopover for politicians seeking to run for national office.

Daley’s legacy of working to build up the city of his birth is chronicled in more than 700 feet of personal papers and artifacts housed in the special collections and university archives of UIC’s Richard J. Daley Library.

A series of courses linked to the collection are being planned, ranging from single-credit courses for Honors College students, who represent a variety of majors, to seminars for alumni and community members beginning this spring.

The first courses offered will focus on Daley’s role in making the city a “global contender,” said David Greenstein, visiting lecturer for Special Collections and University Archives.

“A lot of times, we definitely see him as a really important Chicago figure, and we see him as a national figure who did things like work with presidents. But in many ways the issues he was dealing with in Chicago were global issues,” Greenstein said.

Students will meet at the special collections reading room, where they can pore over thousands of pages of first-hand material that illuminate Daley’s political and private life.

Greenstein’s first class, “City at a Crossroads: Local, National, and Global Politics in Chicago, 1968” is offered this semester. He is developing a broader course on the local and global connections in Chicago that he hopes to teach in the fall.

“It’s going to be a great opportunity for students to learn not only about Chicago and Mayor Daley, but also about working with original documents and other information-literacy skills,” Greenstein said.

Over the years, more than 200 patrons have used the Richard J. Daley Collection for research, from doctoral dissertations to middle- and high-school history projects, said Dan Harper, lecturer and the special collection’s assistant archivist. Among the topics studied have been the late mayor’s dealing with unions and labor issues, housing and race issues.

UIC library officials plan to offer several fellowships to UIC graduate students, as well as to researchers who live more than 100 miles away. The library offers an annual Richard J. Daley Leadership in the Public Sphere Award for high school students participating in the Chicago Metro History Fair who best utilize the collection for research.

Among the items included in the collection are correspondence with presidents, including a signed photo of John F. Kennedy with Daley and his family at the White House after Kennedy’s inauguration.

In addition, Daley’s role as a growing force within the Democratic National Committee is detailed through correspondence with the committee.

The collection was given to UIC at the behest of Eleanor “Sis” Daley, his wife of 40 years. She donated the papers to the institution whose creation the mayor considered one of his great achievements, said their son William.

“My dad always said the greatest decision he made in his entire political career was the decision to fight for the University of Illinois having a Chicago campus,” William Daley said.

Featuring: the David Orr Papers

UIC Special Collections and University Archives has just processed a small collection of holdings from a key figure in Chicago and Cook County political history, the David Orr Papers.

Orr was a alderman in the Chicago City Council and since 1991, has served as Clerk of Cook County. After the sudden and unexpected death of Mayor Harold Washington in 1987, Orr served as acting mayor until the City Council named Eugene Sawyer.

The David Orr Papers is a small collection, only 14 folders. But those folders give glimpses of Orr’s long career of public service, especially in the 2010s. Feel free to check out the finding aid (inventory list) for the David Orr Papers and visit UIC Special Collections and University Archives to see the collection for yourself.